The Black Pirate

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The Black Pirate
Black pirate 1926 poster.jpg
Directed by Albert Parker
Produced by Douglas Fairbanks
Written by Jack Cunningham
Starring Douglas Fairbanks
Billie Dove
Tempe Pigott
Donald Crisp
Cinematography Henry Sharp
(overall cinematography; b&w camera)
Arthur Ball
(Technicolor camera)
George Cave
(Technicolor camera)
Distributed by United Artists
Release dates
  • March 8, 1926 (1926-03-08)
Running time 94 minutes
Country United States
Language Silent
English intertitles

The Black Pirate is a 1926 silent adventure film shot entirely in two-strip Technicolor about an adventurer and a "company" of pirates. It stars Douglas Fairbanks, Donald Crisp, Sam De Grasse, and Billie Dove.

Plot[edit]

The film begins with the looting of a ship already captured and badly mauled, by the pirates. After relieving the ship and crew of valuables, the pirates fire the ship, blowing up the gunpowder on board, sinking her.[1] While the pirates celebrate, two survivors wash up on an island, an old man and his son. Before dying, the older man (Douglas Fairbanks' real-life father) gives his signet ring to his son (Douglas Fairbanks). His son buries him, vowing vengeance.

The Pirate Captain and Lieutenant bring some crew to the other side of the same island to bury some of their plunder. They then plan to murder the other pirates: "Dead men tell no tales." But first, Fairbanks appears as the "Black Pirate", who offers to join their company and fight their best man to prove his worth. After much fighting, the Black Pirate kills the Pirate Captain. The Pirate Lieutenant sneers, and says there is more to being a pirate than sword tricks. To further prove his worth, the Black Pirate says he will capture the next ship of prey single-handed, which he does. He then uses his wits to prevent the pirates from blowing up the ship along with the crew and passengers, suggesting that they hold the ship for ransom. When a "princess" is discovered on board, he urges the crew to use her as a hostage to ensure their ransom will be paid, as long as she remains "spotless and unharmed".

The pirates cheer the Black Pirate, and want to name him captain. The Pirate Lieutenant jeers that they can wait to see if the ransom is paid by noon the next day. If the ransom is not paid, the "Princess" will become the Pirate Lieutenant's prize and the Black Pirate will walk the plank.

It is a long wait. The Pirate Lieutenant tries to attack the "Princess", kill the Black Pirate, and destroy the ship before the deadline. But the Black Pirate and Governor arrive with ships and troops to stop the pirates. There is a fierce fight, with the outcome uncertain.

In the end, the Black Pirate is revealed to be a Duke, and the "Princess" he loves a noble Lady. Even the old one-armed pirate Mac Tavish is moved to tears of joy by the happy ending.[2]

Cast[edit]

Production notes[edit]

Donald Crisp (MacTavish) had directed Fairbanks' Don Q. Son of Zorro (1925) in addition to playing the villain in that film. Crisp, who had been in films for over a decade at this point, was also a major director of silent films. He continued as a character actor for another forty years, winning the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor in 1942 (How Green Was My Valley).

The script was adapted by Jack Cunningham from a story by Fairbanks, who used his middle names "Elton Thomas" as a pseudonym. The film was directed by Albert Parker and has been selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry.

Technicolor[edit]

The Black Pirate was the third feature to be filmed in an early two-tone Technicolor process that had been first introduced in the 1922 feature Toll of the Sea. This reproduces a limited but pleasing range of colors. Ben-Hur— filmed around the same time — contains two-tone sequences but is shot primarily in black-and-white with tinting and toning in many scenes.

Fairbanks spent considerable money on color tests before making Pirate. Two-tone Technicolor at that time required two strips of 35mm film to be fused together back-to-back to create the two-tone palette. Due to the added thickness of the film, and the heat of the projector, there would be so-called cupping of the film, making it difficult to keep the film in focus during projection. (Technicolor later perfected its process, so that two-color films required only a single strip of film.)

Black and white version of The Black Pirate (1926)

References[edit]

External links[edit]