The Blind Man in the Bleachers

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"The Last Game of the Season (A Blind Man in the Bleachers)"
Single by David Geddes
B-side "Run Joey Run"[1]
Released 1975
Format 7" single
Genre Pop
Length 3:30
Label Big Tree
Writer(s) Sterling Whipple
Producer(s) Paul Vance
David Geddes singles chronology
"Run Joey Run"
(1975)
"The Last Game of the Season (A Blind Man in the Bleachers)"
(1975)
"The Blind Man in the Bleachers"
Single by Kenny Starr
from the album The Blind Man in the Bleachers
B-side "Texas Proud"
Released October 1975
Format 7" single
Recorded August 17, 1975
Genre Country
Length 3:25
Label MCA 40524
Writer(s) Sterling Whipple
Producer(s) Snuffy Miller
Kenny Starr singles chronology
"Put Another Notch in Your Belt"
(1975)
"The Blind Man in the Bleachers"
(1975)
"Tonight I'll Face the Man (Who Made It Happen)"
(1976)

"The Blind Man in the Bleachers" is a single by American singer David Geddes. His version, titled "The Last Game of the Season (A Blind Man in the Bleachers)", reached number 18 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1975.[2]

It was later covered by country music artist Kenny Starr. Released in 1975, the song is from his album The Blind Man in the Bleachers. The song peaked at number 2 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles chart.[3] It also reached number 1 on the RPM Country Tracks chart in Canada.[4]

Song story[edit]

The song is a salute to high school football and focuses on a junior varsity football player (who rarely, if ever sees action in varsity games) and his father, a blind man who sits next to the press box – where the speaker is located. The father longs to hear his son's name be announced but is resigned to the boy being a star in his dreams.

The meat of the story comes later in the song, with the scene shifting to the final night of the regular season and the regular fans puzzled at why the boy's father didn't show up for the game. At halftime, with several players injured, the boy takes an emergency phone call and is late to the field. The coach, unaware of what's going on, begins to scold the boy but the boy insists that he's going in on the next play. He does, takes the pitch on the first play and immediately runs for a touchdown. The boy eventually helps rally his team from a deficit and get a come-from-behind win.

In the post-game huddle, the boy becomes emotional and – when asked to explain why he played so well – reveals that his father had died earlier in the evening (why he wasn't at the game) and – presumably having gone to Heaven – was now granted eyesight and got to watch his son play and be the player of the game.

Chart performance[edit]

David Geddes[edit]

Chart (1975) Peak
position
U.S. Billboard Hot 100 18[5]

Kenny Starr[edit]

Chart (1975–1976) Peak
position
U.S. Billboard Hot Country Singles 2
U.S. Billboard Hot 100 58
Canadian RPM Country Tracks 1
Canadian RPM Top Singles 82

References[edit]

  1. ^ "'Blind Man in the Bleachers'". Discogs. Retrieved 24 July 2013. 
  2. ^ "David Geddes chart positions". Allmusic. Retrieved 24 July 2013. 
  3. ^ "Kenny Starr singles". Allmusic. Retrieved 16 March 2011. 
  4. ^ "RPM Country Singles for February 7, 1976". RPM. Retrieved 16 March 2011. 
  5. ^ "David Geddes chart positions". Allmusic. Retrieved 24 July 2013. 
Preceded by
"Country Boy (You Got Your Feet in L.A.)"
by Glen Campbell
RPM Country Tracks
number-one single

January 31, 1976
Succeeded by
"This Time I've Hurt Her More than She Loves Me"
by Conway Twitty