The Brady Kids

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The Brady Kids
Brady kids.jpg
Created by Sherwood Schwartz
Directed by Hal Sutherland
Voices of Susan Olsen
Eve Plumb
Maureen McCormick
Barry Williams
Christopher Knight
Mike Lookinland
Larry Storch
Jane Webb
David E. Smith
Erika Scheimer
Lane Scheimer
Composer(s) Frank DeVol
(theme music)
Ray Ellis
(incidental music)
Country of origin United States
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 2
No. of episodes 22
Production
Executive producer(s) Sherwood Schwartz
Producer(s) Norm Prescott
Lou Scheimer
Editor(s) Doreen A. Dixon
Joseph Simon
Running time 30 min. (with commercials)
Production company(s) Filmation
Redwood Productions
Paramount Network Television
Distributor CBS Television Distribution
Broadcast
Original channel

ABC

WFLD (1982-1983)
Original run September 9, 1972 (1972-09-09)[1] – October 6, 1973 (1973-10-06)[1]
Chronology
Preceded by The Brady Bunch
Followed by The Brady Bunch Hour
Related shows Mission: Magic

The Brady Kids is an animated television series, produced by Filmation in association with Paramount Television and seen on ABC from 1972 to 1973. It was an animated based on ABC's live action sitcom, The Brady Bunch and spun off another Filmation series, Mission: Magic!, starring rock star Rick Springfield.

Background[edit]

In 1972, with the live action sitcom The Brady Bunch preparing for the start of its fourth season, show creator and executive producer Sherwood Schwartz approached Filmation about the creation of an animated series featuring the Brady Kids. Filmation agreed, and Lou Schiemer and Norm Prescott (creators of other Schwartz properties Gilligan's Planet and The New Adventures of Gilligan) headed up the project.[1]

Characters[edit]

The original show's six children (Barry Williams, Christopher Knight, Mike Lookinland, Maureen McCormick, Eve Plumb, and Susan Olsen) voiced their animated counterparts in the first season; however, as the series' name implies, the parents and Alice the housekeeper characters were omitted from the show. At the end of the first season, Filmation asked the kids to continue on their existing contracts for another five episodes in a second season. The kids' original answer was no, prodded on by their agent Harvey Shotz. Filmation threatened to both sue the children over breach of contract, and to continue the show without their voices. Lookinland, Plumb, and Olsen agreed to the extended Filmation contract, while Williams, Knight, and McCormick did not.[2] Williams's and McCormick's voices were replaced by the children of producer Lou Schiemer (Lane and Erika Scheimer, respectively), while Knight's voice was replaced by David E. Smith.

The animated series also added some animal characters. Marlon (voiced by Larry Storch) was an intelligent, red, talking mynah bird and also a wizard who used his magic to help the kids out of jams. Marlon was also notable for his method of flight: he spun his tail feathers like a helicopter rotor rather than using his wings, which were instead used as hands, often for grand gestures as he cast spells.

The Bradys' dog from the live-action series, Tiger, was replaced by a dog named Mop Top (also voiced by Storch). There were also twin panda cubs, Ping and Pong (voiced by Jane Webb), named after the game ping-pong. The pandas only spoke in a Chinese-like gibberish.

There were three human characters created for this show: Chuck White (Storch) was a boastful, self-absorbed teenager (about Greg's age) who was not above cheating to get whatever he wanted, Fleetwood (Storch) was his easygoing sidekick and rounding out this trio was Babs (voiced by Webb), a cute redhead who was smitten with Greg. The three of them went to the same school as the Bradys, and Chuck was sometimes central to the plot as an antagonist.

The Bradys[edit]

Other characters[edit]

  • Marlon: Larry Storch
  • Ping and Pong: Jane Webb
  • Mop Top: Larry Storch
  • Chuck White: Larry Storch
  • Fleetwood: Larry Storch
  • Babs: Jane Webb

Production[edit]

While Schwartz originally intended to hand off full editorial control to Schiemer and Prescott, he eventually returned to become an active part of production, reviewing scripts and advising on creative input.[1]

An enormous amount of animation for this series was copied over from another popular Filmation series, The Archie Show. Walk cycles, profile pictures, and scenes where the Brady kids play in a band were all frame-by-frame replacements for looped frames originally seen of The Archies on The Archie Show. Many of Moptop's poses were copied from the Archies' character Hot Dog. Fleetwood's poses and walk cycles were often copied from Rudy of Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids.

Originally aired as a one-hour segment on The ABC Saturday Superstar Movie,[3] the pilot episode was split into two half-hour segments on The Brady Kids. A total of 22 episodes were produced.[4] Season 1 aired Saturday mornings from 10:30 to 11:00 AM, and season 2 aired Saturday mornings from 11:00 to 11:30 AM.[1] Season 1 contained 17 episodes, and season 2 contained 5. Season 2 was specifically created by Filmation with the intent on 5 episodes to bring the total count of episodes to 22, the minimum required for syndication.[2] Like most 1970s-era Saturday morning cartoon series', The Brady Kids contained an adult laugh track.

The opening sequence featured the fourth season "grid" familiar to The Brady Bunch viewers, without the center column that is normally occupied by the adults (Mike, Carol and Alice). Near the end of the theme song (featuring new lyrics set to the original Brady Bunch theme with a 70's style beat), Marlon flies up and down the center, "magically" transforming the live-action children into their animated counterparts.

Episodes[edit]

  • No. = Overall episode number.
  • Ep = Episode number within the season.

Season 1 (1972)[edit]

No. Ep Title Original airdate
1 1 "Jungle Bungle, Part 1" September 9, 1972 (1972-09-09)
The Bradys, along with Mop Top, enter a balloon race. But their balloon the gang to a mysterious island. The first half of The Brady Kids on Mysterious Island, a pilot movie that originally aired on The ABC Saturday Superstar Movie.
2 2 "Jungle Bungle, Part 2" September 16, 1972 (1972-09-16)
While on a mysterious island, the Bradys meet such strange characters as Marlon the mynah, panda bears Ping and Pong, and and an abominable snowman. The second half of The Brady Kids on Mysterious Island, a pilot movie that originally aired on The ABC Saturday Superstar Movie.
3 3 "Double Trouble" September 23, 1972 (1972-09-23)
Peter wishes he looked like movie star Clint Flint. But Marlon's magic morphs Bobby's body into Clint's and vice versa.
4 4 "Long Gone Silver" September 30, 1972 (1972-09-30)
Lone Ranger fan Bobby orders a pin from his hero's fan club. Marlon attempts to turn the pin into real silver, but instead brings the Lone Ranger's horse to the Brady's tree house.
5 5 "Cindy's Super Friend" October 7, 1972 (1972-10-07)
The Bradys meet Clark Kent and Lois Lane, who help them paint a local bank. But criminal scientist Wily Toulouse La Trick and his henchman Igor replace the kids' paint with invisible paint, allowing the villains to rob the bank. It's up to Superman to save the day!
6 6 "Pop Goes the Mynah" October 14, 1972 (1972-10-14)
After Marlon is sealed in a can at a soda factory, the Bradys have to rescue him.
7 7 "Who Was That Dog...?" October 21, 1972 (1972-10-21)
The Bradys enter their animal friends into a pet show. Moptop falls in love with a French Poodle, but Marlon's magic turns her into a barking woman.
8 8 "It Ain't Necessarily Snow" October 28, 1972 (1972-10-28)
Greg has to learn to ski in order to compete in a race against Chuck. Marlon's magic only makes things worse.
9 9 "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the End Zone" November 4, 1972 (1972-11-04)
The gang accidentally gets a hold of a spaceship, and winds up befriending some little men from Venus.
10 10 "That Was No Worthy Opponent, That Was My Sister" November 11, 1972 (1972-11-11)
Greg, Marcia, and Chuck are all running for class President. Chuck manages to sabotage his opponents' campaigns, but the Brady pets teach him a lesson.
11 11 "You Took the Words Right Out of My Tape" November 18, 1972 (1972-11-18)
The Bradys try to stop a pair of thieves from stealing the crown jewels.
12 12 "Give Me a Home Where the Panda Bears Roam and the Dog and the Mynah Bird Play" November 25, 1972 (1972-11-25)
The kids go on a cattle drive. As usual, Marlon's magic makes a mess of things.
13 13 "It's All Greek to Me" December 2, 1972 (1972-12-02)
Marlon's magic transforms the Bradys (and Wonder Woman, who is posing as a mathematician) to ancient Greece, where they meet Euclid.
14 14 "The Big Time" December 9, 1972 (1972-12-09)
When a television talent show comes to town, the whole kids create their own individual acts so that they can enter.
15 15 "Marlon's Birthday Party" December 16, 1972 (1972-12-16)
The Bradys plan a surprise birthday party for Marlon. Unbeknownst to them, Marlon plans to go back and time and spend his birthday with Merlin. The two wizards mistakenly switch places, with Marlon in the past and Merlin in the future.
16 16 "The Richest Man in the World" December 23, 1972 (1972-12-23)
The gang takes pity on a supposedly poor man, not realizing that he is actually the world's wealthiest man.
17 17 "Wings" December 30, 1972 (1972-12-30)
The Bradys enter a road rally. But the Wrong brothers steal parts of the gang's car to make an airplane. Last episode to feature Barry Williams, Christopher Knight, and Maureen McCormick.

Season 2 (1973)[edit]

No. Ep Title Original airdate
18 1 "Frankincense" September 8, 1973 (1973-09-08)
The Bradys try to foil a couple of jewel thieves who have stolen their jewel-hungry robots. First episode to feature Lane Scheimer, David E. Smith, and Erika Scheimer, who respectively replaced Barry Williams, Christopher Knight and Maureen McCormick in the roles of Greg, Peter, and Marcia Brady.
19 2 "Teacher's Pet" September 15, 1973 (1973-09-15)
Cindy wants her own cat, so Marlon asks to borrow fellow wizard Miss Tickle's ceramic cat. The statue comes to life whenever a magic spell is recited. Marlon forgets the spell, and mistakenly turns the cat into a hippopotamus.
20 3 "Marcia's Lib" September 22, 1973 (1973-09-22)
The boys and the girls form rival camping groups, both of which get lost in the woods. The Brady siblings must work together to find their way back to camp.
21 4 "Ceiling Zero" September 29, 1973 (1973-09-29)
Marlon brings the famous painter Michael "Angelglow" from the past to help the kids paint their tree house. But when Michael is stolen by art thieves, the Bradys have to track him down so that Marlon can return the artist to his own time.
22 5 "Who Believes in Ghosts?" October 6, 1973 (1973-10-06)
The Bradys decide to restore the former home of the deceased Colonel Jones. Thieves hide in the house and attempt to scare the kids off, but the ghost of Colonel Jones has other ideas.

DVD release[edit]

Two episodes of this series (the two part "Jungle Bungle") were released in The Brady Bunch – The Complete Series 21-disc DVD set.[5]

CBS Home Entertainment currently holds the rights to all Brady Bunch-related properties, including The Brady Kids, but currently has no plans to release the show on DVD.

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Moran, Elizabeth (1992). Bradymania! Everything You Always Wanted to Know – and a Few Things You Probably Didn't. Adams Publishing. p. 238. ISBN 1-55850-418-4. 
  2. ^ a b Williams, Barry; Chris Kreski (1992). Growing Up Brady: I was a Teenage Greg. Good Guy Entertainment. p. 300. ISBN 0-9673785-0-8. 
  3. ^ "The ABC Saturday Superstar Movie: The Brady Kids on Mysterious Island". Retrieved Oct 19, 2006. 
  4. ^ "The Brady Kids". Retrieved Oct 19, 2006. 
  5. ^ "The Brady Bunch – The Complete Series (Seasons 1–5 + Shag Carpet Cover) (1969)". Amazon.com. Retrieved Feb 16, 2010.