The Brunts Academy

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The Brunts Academy[1]
Brunts.jpg
Motto Nil Mortalibus Ardui Est (Means Nothing Is Impossible For Humankind)
Established 1709[2][3]
Type Academy
Head Mrs. Janice Addison[1]
Chair Mick Ulyatt[4]
Founder Samuel Brunts[5]
Location The Park
Mansfield,
Nottinghamshire
NG18 2AT
England Coordinates: 53°09′05″N 1°11′23″W / 53.1515°N 1.1896°W / 53.1515; -1.1896
DfE number 891/4463
DfE URN 137763 Tables
Ofsted Reports Pre-academy reports
Students 1620[4]
Gender Coeducational
Ages 11–18
Colours Green and gold
Sixth form 288[4]
Website www.brunts.notts.sch.uk

The Brunts Academy is a large secondary school in north Mansfield, Nottinghamshire in England.[4] The school specialises in the Performing Arts. It has previously been a Grammar School and a Technical School and traces its foundation back to a bequest by Samuel Brunts in 1709. Its past students include 2008 double Olympic Gold medallist Rebecca Adlington.[6]

The Brunts School became The Brunts Academy with effect from the 1 January 2012.

History[edit]

The Brunts Academy can trace its history back to an elementary school that was founded in 1687 and had endowments equal to 100 pounds per year. In 1709,[5] Samuel Brunts left a bequest in order that local children could learn an honest trade. The bequest and the school resulted in 40 boys and girls learning reading, writing and arithmetic by 1831 with the girls particularly studying needlework. It was not until 60 years later that the school and the bequest were combined. By 1891, Samuel Brunts' bequest was worth £3,800 so the new school was named Brunts Technical School.[2]

In 1830 Brunts Charity owned buildings and land in East Bridgford, Nottingham's marketplace and at Claypool in Lincolnshire. It was the richest of all the charitable foundations in Mansfield in 1832 when it was paying out £4 a year to 220 different claimants.[5]

In 1891 a new building was built.[7] In 1976 Brunts Grammar School became a comprehensive.

Organisation[edit]

The school's intake is taken from a number of schools known as the 'family of schools'. The list includes King Edward School, Sutton Road School, St Peter's (C of E) School, High Oakham School and Newgate Primary School.

The school uniform includes distinctive green blazers for both boys and girls. The school colours are green and gold,.[8] whilst the school emblem is a rearing griffin within a shield with "Nil mortalibus ardui est" emblazened upon it.

This former grammar school is distinguished by having its own school song, composed by former (music) teachers H S Rosen and A D Sanders in 1944.

Academic standards[edit]

In 2002, there were nearly 1500 pupils in the school of whom fewer than 1300 were at age 16 or below. The school achieved 57% A-C passes with only 5% achieving no passes at all. This was 5% better than the county and 10% above the national average.[9]

Overall the school is characterised by a high proportion of white pupils compared with the national average and nearly all students have English as their first language. Attainment is "broadly average" and at the inspection of the school by Her Majesty's Inspectorate in 2009, the school was assessed as "satisfactory" with higher marks for its pastoral care.[4]

Notable former pupils[edit]

  • Rebecca Adlington, OBE, double Olympic gold medal winning swimmer.[6]
  • Prof. George Bond, Prof of Biology (1906–1988)[10]
  • Arthur Bown (1921–1994), conductor[11]
  • Mark Bryant (cartoonist), cartoonist[12]
  • Samuel Harrison Clarke CBE (1903–94), Fire research[13]
  • Prof. Nicholas F. R. Crafts (1949–) Professor of Economics[14]
  • Burley Higgins (1913–1940), pilot[15]
  • Prof. Eric Jakeman FRS (1939– ) Prof. of Statistics[16]
  • Sir Richard Leese – Leader of Manchester City Council[17]
  • Nigel Francis Lightfoot, (1945– ), Microbiologist[18]
  • Prof. Major James McCunn (1894–1967) Vet[19][20]
  • Jim McGrath, TV commentator[21]
  • Adrian Metcalfe (1942– ) UK athlete, Silver Medal winner Tokyo Olympics 1964[22]
  • Prof. Norman Millott (1912–1990) Biologist[23]
  • Graham Moore QPM (1947– ) Chief Constable[24]
  • Dr Robert Henry Priestley (1946– ) Biologist and publisher[25]
  • Canon Dr Nicholas Thistlethwaite – authority and writer on church organs[citation needed]
  • Charles Geoffrey Polkey (1921-1944) ww2 Typhoon pilot. shot down and killed 25 May 1944 near Gisors France.
  • Sir Bernard (Evans) Tomlinson (1920– ) pathologist[26]
  • Dr Charles Wass (1911–89), mines safety expert[27]
  • John Whetton – UK athlete, European 1500 metre champion Athens 1969[22]
  • Robin Keith Wilson – Provincial Grand Master of Nottinghamshire Freemasons[28]

Awards[edit]

In 2003 Brunts was awarded the Artsmark Gold Award and in 2006 the Healthy Schools Gold Standard and the Full International School Award.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b The Brunts School, Nottinghamshire County Council, accessed 19 August 2008
  2. ^ a b Nottinghamshire in the Eighteenth Century, Jonathan David Chambers, p308, 1966, ISBN 0-7146-1285-5, accessed 18 August 2008
  3. ^ The Beauties of England and Wales, Or, Delineations, Topographical, Historical, and Descriptive, of Each County, John Britton et al., 1813, accessed 19 August 2008
  4. ^ a b c d e f 2009 Inspection report, accessed 17 May 2010
  5. ^ a b c History, gazetteer, and directory of Nottinghamshire: and the town and county of the town of Nottingham, William White, 1832
  6. ^ a b "Open top bus parade to salute double Olympic gold medallist Rebecca Adlington". chad.co.uk. Retrieved 2008-08-18. 
  7. ^ Bromley House Library Archives, index
  8. ^ School portal, accessed 19 August 2008
  9. ^ Department for Children, Schools and Families, accessed 19 August 2008
  10. ^ Who's Who 2008, accessed 18 August 2008
  11. ^ "Arthur Bown (1921–1994) Founder of the Boots Orchestra". The Boots Orchestra. Retrieved 2008-11-04. 
  12. ^ Dictionary of Twentieth-Century British Cartoonists and Caricaturists, 2000, p.22
  13. ^ ‘CLARKE, Samuel Harrison’, Who Was Who, A & C Black, 1920–2007; online edn, Oxford University Press, Dec 2007 accessed 20 Aug 2008
  14. ^ CRAFTS, Prof. Nicholas Francis Robert’, Who's Who 2008, A & C Black, 2008; online edn, Oxford University Press, Dec 2007 accessed 20 Aug 2008
  15. ^ "Sergeant Pilot William Burley Higgins". Whitwell Local History Group. Retrieved 2008-11-04. [dead link]
  16. ^ ‘JAKEMAN, Prof. Eric’, Who's Who 2008, A & C Black, 2008; online edn, Oxford University Press, Dec 2007 accessed 20 Aug 2008
  17. ^ glasgows.co.uk
  18. ^ LIGHTFOOT, Nigel Francis’, Who's Who 2008, A & C Black, 2008; online edn, Oxford University Press, Dec 2007 accessed 20 Aug 2008
  19. ^ Obituary, The Times Thursday, 6 April 1967; pg. 16
  20. ^ ‘McCUNN, Major James’, Who Was Who, A & C Black, 1920–2007; online edn, Oxford University Press, Dec 2007 accessed 20 Aug 2008
  21. ^ Presenters, Channel 4 Television, accessed 20 August 2008
  22. ^ a b Whetton, John (2008-08-27). "What a magical boost for Mansfield". Chad. Johnston Press Digital Publishing. Retrieved 2008-11-04. 
  23. ^ ‘MILLOTT, Prof. Norman’, Who Was Who, A & C Black, 1920–2007; online edn, Oxford University Press, Dec 2007 accessed 20 Aug 2008
  24. ^ MOORE, Graham’, Who's Who 2008, A & C Black, 2008; online edn, Oxford University Press, Dec 2007 accessed 20 Aug 2008
  25. ^ ‘PRIESTLEY, Dr Robert Henry’, Who's Who 2008, A & C Black, 2008; online edn, Oxford University Press, Dec 2007 accessed 20 Aug 2008
  26. ^ ‘TOMLINSON, Sir Bernard (Evans)’, Who's Who 2008, A & C Black, 2008; online edn, Oxford University Press, Dec 2007 accessed 20 Aug 2008
  27. ^ WASS, Dr Charles Alfred Alan’, Who Was Who, A & C Black, 1920–2007; online edn, Oxford University Press, Dec 2007 accessed 20 Aug 2008
  28. ^ http://www.nottinghamshirefreemasons.co.uk

External links[edit]