The Burlington Free Press

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Logoburlfreepress.jpg
Type Daily newspaper
Format Tabloid
Owner(s) The Gannett Company
Publisher Jim Fogler
Editor Mike Townsend
Founded 1827
(as the Free Press Weekly)
Headquarters 191 College Street
Burlington, VT 05402-0010
 United States
Circulation 105,995 Daily[1]
109,177 Sunday[1]
Official website BurlingtonFreePress.com

The Burlington Free Press is a daily newspaper based in Burlington, Vermont, in the United States. With a circulation of about 105,995 daily and 109,177 on Sundays, it is the largest daily newspaper in Vermont.[1]

The current editor of The Burlington Free Press is Mike Townsend.

The newspaper employs 272 full-time employees in its Burlington headquarters. International news is usually reprinted stories supplied by the Associated Press and Reuters news services.

History[edit]

The Burlington Free Press originally began as the Free Press Weekly, publishing its first issue in 1827. With use of the telegraph, the newspaper became an evening daily in 1848, although it did not publish a Sunday newspaper until 1965. With the purchase of the Burlington Times in 1868, the Free Press Association was founded. In 1882 the evening edition was canceled due to poor sales and an influx of morning edition readers. In 1961 a new corporation, Free Press Association, Inc., was organized by high-positioned Free Press personnel who purchased it from 50 stockholders. In 1971 the Free Press changed hands, merging with the Public Opinion and becoming a part of the Gannett Company.

In July 2008, the company announced they would raise the retail price of their newspapers, except on Sundays, from fifty cents to seventy-five cents. This did not affect the price for subscribers.

In December 2008, the Gannett Company announced a company-wide workforce reduction of ten percent. The Burlington Free Press laid off six of its newsroom staff.

On January 19, 2009, the company introduced a "compactly-edited" daily newspaper, to circulate three days a week, with the full normal edition of The Burlington Free Press appearing on the rest of the days of the week.

In June 2012, The Burlington Free Press switched from the broadsheet format it had used for decades to an all-color tabloid format, at the same time introducing a paywall to its website that in the first three months caused a 12 percent drop in the paper's online page views (from about 600,000 to about 530,000).[2]

In October 2012, The Burlington Free Press announced plans to sell seven of its 12 properties in downtown Burlington, worth an estimated $3.3 million. The paper plans to keep its printing press and mail room, but is selling office space.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Media Note: Layoffs at the Burlington Free Press [UPDATED]". Seven Days. Retrieved 2014-01-04. 
  2. ^ Haughney, Christine (September 30, 2012). "Burlington Free Press Loses Ground in Vermont". The New York Times. Retrieved 22 October 2012. 
  3. ^ Freese, Alicia (October 19, 2012). "Burlington Free Press plans to sell seven of its downtown buildings". VTDigger.org. Retrieved 22 October 2012. 

http://abcas3.auditedmedia.com/ecirc/newssearchus.asp The Burlington Free Press has had drastic circulation drops as seen in this link from the audit bureau of circulation. They are now 35,299 Sunday and 28,138 weekday. This is about a 50% drop from the 1990s up to 2004.

External links[edit]


List of daily newspapers in Vermont
Bennington Banner | Barre Montpelier Times Argus | Brattleboro Reformer | The Burlington Free Press
Caledonian-Record | Newport Daily Express | Rutland Herald | St. Albans Messenger


Huge circulation drop at Burlington Free Press as confirmed in this link from ABC Audit Bureau of Circulation

  • http://abcas3.auditedmedia.com/ecirc/newssearchus.asp The Burlington Free Press has had drastic circulation drops as seen in this link from the audit bureau of circulation. They are now 35,299 Sunday and 28,138 weekday. This is about a 50% drop from the 1990s up to 2004.