The Chance of a Lifetime

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Not to be confused with The Chance of a Lifetime (1916 film).
The Chance of a Lifetime
Chanceofalifetime.jpg
Film poster
Directed by William Castle
Produced by Wallace MacDonald
Written by Jack Boyle
Paul Yawitz
Starring Chester Morris
Erik Rolf
Jeanne Bates
Music by M. W. Stoloff
Cinematography Ernest Miller
Edited by Jerome Thoms
Distributed by Columbia Pictures
Release dates
  • October 26, 1943 (1943-10-26)
Running time 65 min.
Country United States
Language English

The Chance of a Lifetime is a 1943 crime drama starring Chester Morris, Erik Rolf and Jeanne Bates. It is one of 14 films made by Columbia Pictures involving detective Boston Blackie, a criminal-turned-crime solver. This was the sixth in the series and one of three that did not have his name in the title. The film is also William Castle's directorial debut. As with many of the films of the period, this was a flag waver to support America's efforts during World War II.

Plot[edit]

Boston Blackie (Chester Morris) helps get prisoners with needed skills released on parole to help in the machine and tool plant of his friend, Arthur Manleder (Lloyd Corrigan). Those chosen want to support America's war effort. All of the parolees have to stay in Blackie's apartment, all except robber Dooley Watson. Blackie allows him to see his wife and son.

Watson goes after the payroll money he stole before he was captured. His wife Mary (Jeanne Bates) convinces him to give it back, but his partners in crime, "Red" Taggart (John Harmon) and "Nails" Blanton (Douglas Fowley), have been waiting patiently for their share. When they threaten Dooley's family, Dooley fights back. Red is killed in the ensuing struggle. Nails runs off. If Boston Blackie is to save his project, he has to capture Nails and force him to confess the death was in self-defense, all while dodging Inspector Farraday (Richard Lane).

Cast[edit]

Uncredited:

Reception[edit]

Critic Leonard Maltin said that star Chester Morris "brought to the role a delightful offhand manner and sense of humour that kept the films fresh even when the scripts weren't."[this quote needs a citation] Hal Erickson of Allmovie said "The Chance of a Lifetime represents the first directorial effort of William Castle, who later claimed that, saddled with a hopeless project, he made the film "work" by re-arranging the reels in the editing room."[1]

References[edit]

External links[edit]