The Church Quarterly Review

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The Church Quarterly Review  
Discipline Church of England, Theology
Language English
Publication details
Publisher
Publication history
1875-1971
Frequency Quarterly
Indexing
ISSN 0269-4034

The Church Quarterly Review is an English journal published by the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge. It existed independently from 1875 until 1968; in that year it merged with the London Quarterly and Holborn Review, a Methodist journal and became known as The Church Quarterly, which was published until 1971.

History[edit]

It was first published privately in 1875, at the instigation of Richard William Church, then Dean of St Paul's Cathedral, and focused on Church of England and theology issues from a High church perspective. Its original mission statement was "to be worthily representative of the teaching and position of the Church of England,"[1] and it advertised itself as "the recognised organ of orthodox opinion for the Church of England."[2] The first issue was published in October 1875, and the first article ("Italy and her Church") was written by William Ewart Gladstone.[1]

In 1920, the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge took over the journal, and ended its longstanding policy of publishing mainly anonymous contributions[3] as well as its High church associations; in 1921, longtime editor A.C. Headlam gave up his position.[1]

In 1968, the journal merged with the London Quarterly and Holborn Review, a Methodist journal (merged from two Victorian journals). The result of this merger was The Church Quarterly, which ceased publication in 1971.[1]

Editors[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Altholz, Josef L. (1984). "The Church Quarterly Review, 1875–1900: A Marked File and Other Sources". Victorian Periodicals Review 17 (1–2): 52–57. JSTOR 20082103. 
  2. ^ "The Church Quarterly Review (advertisement)". The Nineteenth Century 15: 1081. 1884. Retrieved 6 July 2010. 
  3. ^ a b "The English Church Quarterly". The New York Times. 14 November 1881. Retrieved 4 July 2010. 
  4. ^ "A. Headlam". Retrieved 5 July 2010. 
  5. ^ "Our Cable Letter". The New York Times. 5 October 1901. Retrieved 4 July 2010. 
  6. ^ Arnott, F.R. "Wand, John William Charles (1885 - 1977)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. Retrieved 5 July 2010.