List of Mormon fundamentalist leaders

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Mormon fundamentalist leaders are those who lead (or have led) a Mormon fundamentalist group.

Early Mormon leaders[edit]

These leaders were presidents of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, which authorized plural marriage for many years. Mormon fundamentalists generally accept the first three LDS Church presidents as prophets of God:

Some Mormon fundamentalists also regard the next three LDS Church presidents as leaders, because of their support for plural marriage after 1890. However, some reject LDS Church presidents beginning with Wilford Woodruff, due to Woodruff's decision to issue the 1890 Manifesto. Many others reject Joseph F. Smith, due to his issuance of the Second Manifesto in 1904:

Major Mormon fundamentalist groups[edit]

When The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints began excommunicating members who practiced polygamy after the Second Manifesto, Mormon fundamentalists began breaking away from the LDS Church. At first, there was one main Mormon fundamentalist group, the Council of Friends, also known as the "Woolley group" and the "Priesthood Council".[7] The Council of Friends was centered in Salt Lake City and the Short Creek Community, later called Colorado City, Arizona and Hildale, Utah. The Council of Friends would ultimately split into four Mormon fundamentalist sects, the Latter Day Church of Christ[8] (1935) located in Salt Lake City, Utah, the Apostolic United Brethren[9] (1954), located in Bluffdale, Utah, the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints[9] (1954), located in Colorado City, Arizona and Hildale, Utah, and Church of the Firstborn of the Fulness of Times,[10] located in Chihuahua, Mexico.

Factional breakdown: Mormon fundamentalist sects[edit]

Council of Friends and groups evolving from it[edit]

Pre-split Council of Friends leaders[edit]

The following are the leaders of the Council of Friends prior to its split:[11][12][13]

Kingstons[edit]

Due to a succession conflict after J. Leslie Broadbent's death, Charles W. Kingston and Elden Kingston created a splinter group called the Latter Day Church of Christ, or the Kingston clan.[13]

Apostolic United Brethren[edit]

Joseph W. Musser ordained Rulon C. Allred into the Council of Friends. The Council refused to admit Allred; this resulted in a split, whereby followers of Allred became known as the Apostolic United Brethren. Musser ordained a new council, known as the 1952 New Priesthood Council.[14] The line of succession of the AUB is as follows:[13]

Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints[edit]

After the Short Creek community split it continued to thrive, and became known as the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints under Leroy S. Johnson. Its leaders include:[12][13]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints Inc.[edit]

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints Inc.[17] was formed in September 2002 when FLDS Church president Warren Jeffs excommunicated Winston Blackmore; for two decades, Blackmore was bishop of the Bountiful, British Columbia group of the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (FLDS Church). The community split nearly evenly—about 700 people continue to follow Blackmore, while about 500 follow Jeffs.[18]

Centennial Park ("Second Ward")[edit]

Under Leroy Johnson's leadership, Marion Hammon and Alma Timpson were dismissed from the Short Creek community in 1983; they went on to create the Centennial Park group (or "Second Ward") in Centennial Park, Arizona. "Second Ward" distinguishes it from the FLDS Church, which is known as the "First Ward".[19][20]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and the Kingdom of God[edit]

This group (also known as the Nielsen/Naylor group)[21] primarily resides in the Salt Lake Valley. It broke with the Centennial Park group after Marion Hammon died in 1988.[22][23] Frank Naylor (apostle) and Ivan Neilsen (high priest and bishop) disagreed with Alma Timpson’s leadership of Centennial Park, prompting them to create a new group known as the "Third Ward" with Naylor presiding;[23] they likewise primarily reside in the Salt Lake Valley. They have formed a close association with Winston Blackmore’s community of Bountiful, British Columbia.[22][23]

Righteous Branch of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints[edit]

After the murder of Rulon C. Allred in 1977, Gerald Peterson, Sr proclaimed that Allred had bequeathed the priesthood to him. Peterson went on to found the Righteous Branch of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints the following year.

Other Mormon fundamentalist groups[edit]

Church of the Firstborn of the Fulness of Times[edit]

The Church of the Firstborn of the Fulness of Times has its headquarters in northern Mexico. It was founded in 1955 by Joel LeBaron and members of his family. LeBaron claimed his priestly line of authority from his father Alma (who was ordained by Alma's grandfather Benjamin F. Johnson, who received the priesthood from Joseph Smith). The church exists in Chihuahua Mexico, Los Molinos, Baja California, San Diego, California and in Central America; there is also a large group in Salt Lake City, UT.

Church of Jesus Christ in Solemn Assembly[edit]

The Church of Jesus Christ in Solemn Assembly and its political arm, the Confederate Nations of Israel, are headquartered in Big Water, Utah.[24][25][26] It was founded in 1977 by Alex Joseph and initially grew rapidly. However after the death of Joseph the status of this sect is unknown.

  • Alex Joseph (1977-1998)
  • Current leadership unknown (1998–present)

School of the Prophets[edit]

The School of the Prophets has its headquarters in the Salem, Utah area. In 1968 Robert C. Crossfield published revelations he had received in the Book of Onias, which (among other things) chastised certain LDS Church leaders; he was excommunicated in 1972.[27] In 1982 Crossfield established a School of the Prophets, overseen by a president and six counselors.[27] Ron and Dan Lafferty (convicted of the July 1984 murder of their brother's wife and infant daughter) served for a month as counselors in the Provo, Utah School of the Prophets in March 1984.[28] Four months after being removed [29] from the school, they committed their crimes. The continuing revelations were later named the Second Book of Commandments;[30] it has 262 sections, dating from 1961 to the present. (2BC Website)

True and Living Church of Jesus Christ of Saints of the Last Days[edit]

The True and Living Church of Jesus Christ of Saints of the Last Days (TLC) has its headquarters in Manti, Utah. Membership is estimated at 300 to 500. Organized in 1994, the TLC was a new "restoration" for the "very last days" before the Second Coming of Jesus. While the church initially grew rapidly it has since stagnated, declining in numbers and converts since it ceased missionary efforts in 2000.

The Church of the Firstborn and the General Assembly of Heaven[edit]

The Church of the Firstborn and the General Assembly of Heaven was originally organized in Magna, Utah by former members of the LDS Church.[32] It practices polygamy and the law of consecration. Its leader, Terrill R. Dalton, purports to be the Holy Ghost and the father of Jesus.[33] However, the group may have declined in numbers after its relocation from Idaho to Montana[34] and Dalton's and assistant Geody Harman's[35] arrest for[36] (and conviction of) two counts of rape.[37]

  • Terrill R. Dalton (c. 2001–present)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Joseph Smith Jr., 1st President of the Church". History of the Church. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 2004. Retrieved 1 April 2010. 
  2. ^ "Brigham Young, 2nd President of the Church". History of the Church. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 2004. Retrieved 1 April 2010. 
  3. ^ "John Taylor, 3rd President of the Church". History of the Church. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 2004. Retrieved 1 April 2010. 
  4. ^ "Wilford Woodruff, 4th President of the Church". History of the Church. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 2004. Retrieved 1 April 2010. 
  5. ^ "Lorenzo Snow, 5th President of the Church". History of the Church. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 2004. Retrieved 1 April 2010. 
  6. ^ "Joseph F. Smith, 6th President of the Church". History of the Church. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 2004. Retrieved 1 April 2010. 
  7. ^ Hales, Brian C. "The Council of Friends". mormonfundamentalism.com. Retrieved 16 January 2014. 
  8. ^ Hales, Brian C. "Charles Elden Kingston". mormonfundamentalism.com. Retrieved 16 January 2014. 
  9. ^ a b Hales, Brian C. "1952 Priesthood Council Split". mormonfundamentalism.com. Retrieved 16 January 2014. 
  10. ^ Hales, Brian C. "Dayer LeBaron". mormonfundamentalism.com. Retrieved 16 January 2014. 
  11. ^ Hales, Brian C (2009). "Questions regarding the described 1886 ordinations". MormonFundamentalism.com. Retrieved 1 April 2010. 
  12. ^ a b "Official website of the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints". The Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. 2008. Retrieved 1 April 2010. 
  13. ^ a b c d Hales, Brian C (2009). "Fundamentalist leadership succession chart". MormonFundamentalism.com. Retrieved 1 April 2010. 
  14. ^ Hales, Brian C (2009). "Rulon C. Allred". MormonFundamentalism.com. Retrieved 1 April 2010. 
  15. ^ McKinley, Carol (March 5, 2011), Inside a troubled fundamentalist Mormon sect, Salon Media Group, Inc., retrieved March 11, 2011, "In just a few weeks, Jeffs has gone on a rampage, kicking out at least 40 of his most pious men. One of those faithful is Merril Jessop, a 70year-old FLDS bishop." 
  16. ^ Wagner, Dennis (February 24, 2011). "Jailed sect leader retakes legal control of church". USA Today. "Utah records show Nielson formally quit that post Jan. 28." 
  17. ^ Dobner, Jennifer (21 June 2014). "Mormon church sues Canadian polygamist over trademarked name". Reuters. Retrieved 26 June 2014. 
  18. ^ Utah Attorney General’s Office and Arizona Attorney General's Office. The Primer, Helping Victims of Domestic Violence and Child Abuse in Polygamous Communities:Fundamentalist Mormon Communities. Updated June 2006. Pages 11-22.
  19. ^ Hales, Brian C (2009). "Centennial Park and the "Second Ward"". MormonFundamentalism.com. Retrieved 1 April 2010. 
  20. ^ Utah Attorney General’s Office and Arizona Attorney General's Office. The Primer, Helping Victims of Domestic Violence and Child Abuse in Polygamous Communities. Updated June 2006. Page 14.
  21. ^ http://ldsmovement.pbworks.com/f/Church+of+Jesus+Christ+of+Latter-day+Saints+and+the+Kingdom+of+God+-+Utah+Business+Filing.pdf
  22. ^ a b Utah Attorney General’s Office and Arizona Attorney General's Office. The Primer, Helping Victims of Domestic Violence and Child Abuse in Polygamous Communities. Updated June 2006. Page 21.
  23. ^ a b c Hales, Brian C (2009). "The Naylor Group (Salt Lake County)". MormonFundamentalism.com. Retrieved 1 April 2010. 
  24. ^ Stokes, Jerry (2007), Changing World Religions, Cults & Occult, p. 159, retrieved October 7, 2013 
  25. ^ Melton, J. Gordon (1992), Encyclopedic Handbook of Cults in America, retrieved October 7, 2013 
  26. ^ Webb, Loren (December 22, 2012), Southern Utah Memories: Alex Joseph Story, Big Water, Utah: KCSG Television, retrieved October 7, 2013 
  27. ^ a b Hales, Brian C., Robert C. Crossfield, retrieved August 26, 2011 
  28. ^ Van Wagoner, Richard S. (1989) [1986], Mormon Polygamy: A History (2d ed.), Salt Lake City, Utah: Signature Books, ISBN 978-0-941214-79-7 
  29. ^ Crossfield, Robert. "The Controversy Between Ron and Dan Lafferty And the School of the Prophets". United Order Publications. Retrieved 11 September 2011. 
  30. ^ Unsworth, Alam, Second Book of Commandments, retrieved September 11, 2011 
  31. ^ McFall, Michael (27 June 2013). "Utah polygamous church leader dies of a heart attack". Salt Lake Tribune. Retrieved 28 June 2013. 
  32. ^ Hollenhorst, John (July 2, 2009), Church of 'Holy Ghost' rocked by sex and assassination allegations, KSL-TV, retrieved 2013-02-15 
  33. ^ Hollenhorst, John (September 15, 2009), 'Holy Ghost' cult stirs Idaho debate after move from Utah, Salt Lake City: KSL-TV, retrieved 2013-02-15 
  34. ^ Hollenhorst, John (18 August 2010), Rape Charges Filed Five Years Later Against Man Claiming to be 'Holy Ghost', KSL-TV, retrieved 2013-02-15 
  35. ^ Hunt, Stephen (April 14, 2012), "Religious sect leader pleads guilty in 'Holy Ghost' rape case", The Salt Lake Tribune, retrieved 2013-02-15 
  36. ^ "Sect leader waives extradition on rape charge". KSL-TV. (AP). August 24, 2010. Retrieved 2013-02-15. 
  37. ^ Morgan, Emiley (March 22, 2012), "Sect leader 'Holy Ghost' convicted of raping daughter", Deseret News