The Cleveland–Loretta Quagmire

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"The Cleveland–Loretta Quagmire"
Family Guy episode
Episode no. Season 4
Episode 5
Directed by James Purdum
Written by Patrick Henry
Mike Henry
Production code 4ACX08
Original air date June 12, 2005
Guest actors
Episode chronology
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Family Guy (season 4)
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"The Cleveland–Loretta Quagmire" is the fifth episode of the fourth season of the American animated television series Family Guy. This episode marks the final appearance of Loretta, until the season 7 episode, "Love, Blactually". In the episode, Cleveland's wife Loretta cheats on him with Quagmire, due to Cleveland's "lack of passion" and "not being a real man". With Cleveland separating from Loretta, this episode lays much of the foundation for The Cleveland Show. This episode is rated TV-14 DLS. The episode features guest performances from Jane Carr, Randy Crenshaw, Miriam Flynn, Emeril Lagasse, Denis Martell, Mark Peredes, Randy Savage, and Fred Tatasciore, as well as several recurring guest performers for the series.

Plot[edit]

Peter invites his friends on his fishing boat for a party at sea. While Quagmire is fishing, he catches a fish that lands in Loretta's shirt. She invites him to reach in and grab it, which after a moment of hesitation he does. While Quagmire's hand is between her breasts, Cleveland approaches and mentions the snacks Peter has supplied, serenely saying hello to Quagmire before walking away. After the fish is finally extracted, Loretta propositions Quagmire (to his amazement). During a game of charades, Joe falls overboard and nearly drowns while attempting to portray "Natalie Wood" in her last moments, and is revived by a member of the crew. Because no one in the family knew what to do in an emergency, Lois insists that they take CPR classes. Peter has his CPR card revoked almost instantly for inappropriate behavior (he unnecessarily performs CPR on two men who were in a minor car accident and takes off their pants to see if they soiled themselves).

While Peter ponders taking the CPR course again, he and Brian hear screams coming from Cleveland’s house. They rush in to find Loretta having sex on the couch. At first Peter believes Cleveland is piebald, but Brian says Loretta was committing adultery with a white man who has a tattoo on his left buttock. Embarrassed, they leave without seeing the man’s face, although Quagmire raises his head from the sofa immediately afterwards. They decide that the last thing in the world they should do is tell anyone about it. So after doing everything in the world in one day, they tell Lois, the Swansons and Quagmire that Loretta is having an affair. Peter volunteers to tell Cleveland, since he had experience with delivering bad news (he was in a barbershop quartet performing musical diagnoses for terminally ill patients). Meeting Cleveland at The Drunken Clam with Brian, Peter delivers the news in a typically overly-detailed fashion.

When Cleveland calmly questions Loretta about the affair, she angrily responds that she needs a real man. Cleveland responds in his usual mild-mannered way, even apologizing, and he ends up leaving the house without an angry word. Feeling responsible, Peter invites him to stay in their house. Lois is worried that Cleveland does not seem upset by the fact that his wife cheated on him, or kicked him out of the house at all. Peter suggests that what Cleveland needs is a "revenge lay" and decides to ask Quagmire for advice. Quagmire is "working out" in revealing leopard-skin briefs when Peter and Brian arrive. They instantly recognize a tattoo of his phone number on his buttock and realize that Quagmire was Loretta's partner. Despite Quagmire's pleas, Peter and Brian immediately tell Cleveland, but they and Lois are surprised when he accepts it with little emotion.

Lois tells Cleveland that Loretta wants him to express his feelings: that women sometimes want men to be strong and stand up for them. Peter then tries to get his friend to feel some passion by taking him to a wrestling match featuring Randy Savage, but it affects Peter much more than Cleveland. He then puts on a Quagmire mask and wrestles with Brian (who is unwillingly wearing a Loretta mask) on the ground. This method finally yields results: Cleveland becomes enraged and vows to kill Quagmire.

Peter realizes that his plan has worked too well and tries to protect Quagmire by hiding him at Mayor West's mansion. West's lunacy soon proves too much even for Quagmire and he returns home and calls Cleveland to apologize. Cleveland appears and chases Quagmire around his house wielding a baseball bat. Despite finally having Quagmire cowering and at his mercy, and the encouragement of Emperor Palpatine, Cleveland realizes that he is unable to hurt another living person, no matter how badly they have hurt him. Peter tricks Loretta into seeing Cleveland by saying that Lois needs an intervention, but instead of reconciling, the couple angrily agree to get a divorce, with Cleveland saying that he may not be perfect, but he deserves better than Loretta. Even though this is making a new start between Cleveland and Loretta, Peter describes this ordeal "As beautiful as an HBO minority fairy tale". He then begins to tell the moral of the show when he is randomly kicked in the crotch, yelling at the man who kicked him not knowing they are on a fictional TV show called Kicked in the Nuts until the man says he is on the show and that he is the host, after which they are surprised and talk about how they watch the show.

Cleveland and Quagmire apologize to each other and, at Quagmire's insistence, take out their remaining aggressions on each other in a boxing ring (in a parody of the ending to Rocky III).

Production[edit]

Mike Henry wrote the episode, along with his brother, Patrick.

This episode was written by Mike Henry and his brother, Patrick Henry, and directed by former Futurama director James Purdum during the course of the fourth production season. According to the DVD commentary for this episode, Loretta was written out of Family Guy because her voice actor, Alex Borstein (who also voices Lois and other female characters), was apparently tired of voicing Loretta.[citation needed] However, Loretta would later appear one last time in Season 7's "Love, Blactually" before being killed off.

In addition to the regular cast, actress Jane Carr, actor Randy Crenshaw, actress Miriam Flynn, professional chef Emeril Lagasse, voice actor Denis Martell, voice actor Mark Peredes, pro wrestler Randy Savage, and voice actor Fred Tatasciore guest starred in the episode. Recurring guest voice actors Ralph Garman, writer David A. Goodman, writer Danny Smith, actress Jennifer Tilly, and writer John Viener made minor performances in the episode. Recurring guest cast members Mike Henry, Patrick Warburton, and Adam West also appeared in the episode, portraying the characters of Cleveland Brown, Joe Swanson, and Mayor West respectively.

Cultural references[edit]

  • Peter sings the song "Rock Lobster" by The B52's to Cleveland in this episode.[1]
  • While the adults play charades on the ship, Joe does the death of Natalie Wood.
  • A cutaway shows Peter repainting the famous Sistine Chapel, with a portrait of actor/wrestler André the Giant, a reference to the Andre the Giant Has a Posse street art campaign. He explains that this "would be a little hipper...[to] bring back...those boys you scared away," a reference to the Roman Catholic Church sex abuse scandal.
  • While at the CPR teaching session, Peter says the CPR dummy is “hard, jagged and tastes like alcohol; Just like kissing Faye Dunaway
  • When Brian hears Loretta screaming, Peter seems to fail to understand what has happened. Brian tries to explain that it sounded like someone was screaming, to which Peter replies with "Trouble at the old mill?" This is a reference to Lassie and the innumerable dangers to which Lassie alerted people.
  • Quagmire's "My Fellow Americans" flashback is a reference to the Lewinsky scandal, which involved Bill Clinton having sexual relations with his intern. Quagmire resembles President Clinton during that scene.
  • The transition scene from Peter's house to Quagmire's house when Peter decides to talk to him about a revenge lay is a parody of the transition scenes from the original Transformers cartoon series, with the Autobot and Decepticon symbols being replaced with Peter and Quagmire's faces.
  • The scene where Cleveland finally learns to get angry at Loretta's infidelity causes him to pull out a can of spinach, squeezing the contents out and swallowing it, then blowing steam out of his ears. This is a direct reference to the old Popeye cartoon shorts; the theme song for the spinach-eating sequences is also used.
  • When Peter wants to quickly move out, he screams "to the Petercopter" and steps into a helicopter that reminds of Budgie the Little Helicopter. Later a similar scene happens in which Peter wants to move out, while screaming "to the Hinden-peter", referring to the Hindenburg airship. As soon as the zeppelin moves out of view, it crashes with a big explosion into Joe's house, referring to the Hindenburg disaster on May 6, 1937.
  • In a cutaway, Quagmire and Cleveland imitate the Festrunk brothers, the “two wild and crazy guys” from the 1970s Saturday Night Live episodes. Peter appears dressed as Beldar from the Coneheads, another of Aykroyd's SNL characters from that era.
  • Palpatine, from Star Wars, urges Cleveland to “let the hatred flow through” him, which he says to Luke Skywalker in Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi. Lois then precedes to push him out of the frame.
  • This episode has three references to the Rocky film series. The first is when Cleveland is doing pull-ups in the front doorway of the Griffin home, and trainer Mickey Goldmill appears and exclaims, "He's a wreckin' machine!!" The second is at the end when Cleveland and Quagmire are starting a friendly boxing match. The third is the song "Eye of the Tiger" by Survivor, which plays just before the closing credits.[2]

Reception[edit]

With Fox in second place among adults 18 to 49 years old, this episode gained a total of 8.35 million viewers.[3] Kim Voynar of TV Squad wrote a favorable review, saying "This episode of Family Guy was just chock-full of the tasteless and tacky moments that make the show so popular."[1]

The "You Have AIDS" sequence, in which Peter and a barbershop quartet dance, in musical revue fashion, around the bed of a man with end-stage AIDS, delivering the patient's diagnosis in song, drew protests from several AIDS service organizations.[4][5] According to the DVD commentary, the song was meant to show how Peter would deliver bad news in the "best way possible". Also according to the DVD commentary, the commentators say that the song is meant to be tasteless, because that is the joke.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Voynar, Kim (2005-06-13). "Family Guy: The Cleveland-Loretta Quagmire". TV Squad. Retrieved 2009-11-15. 
  2. ^ http://www.tv.com/family-guy/the-cleveland-loretta-quagmire/episode/365974/trivia.html
  3. ^ Aurthur, Kate (2005-06-14). "CBS Outscores the N.B.A.". The New York Times. Retrieved 2009-03-26. 
  4. ^ Adams, Bob (August 22, 2005). ""Family Guy" has fun with AIDS". Advocate.com. PlanetOut Inc. Retrieved December 12, 2006. 
  5. ^ Bozell, Brent (April 10, 2009). "Fox's "Comedic Genius"". Townhall.com. Retrieved August 24, 2009.