The Design of Experiments

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The Design of Experiments is a 1935 book by the British statistician R.A. Fisher, which has been highly influential,[1][2][3][4] effectively founding the field of design of experiments.

Among other contributions, the book introduced the concept of the null hypothesis,[5] in the context of the lady tasting tea experiment.

Chapters[edit]

  1. Introduction
  2. The principles of experimentation, illustrated by a psycho-physical experiment
  3. A historical experiment on growth rate
  4. An agricultural experiment in randomized blocks
  5. The Latin square
  6. The factorial design in experimentation
  7. Confounding
  8. Special cases of partial confounding
  9. The increase of precision by concomitant measurements. Statistical Control
  10. The generalization of null hypotheses. Fiducial probability
  11. The measurement of amount of information in general

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Stanley, J. C. (1966). "The Influence of Fisher's "The Design of Experiments" on Educational Research Thirty Years Later". American Educational Research Journal 3 (3): 223. doi:10.3102/00028312003003223. 
  2. ^ Box, JF (February 1980). "R. A. Fisher and the Design of Experiments, 1922-1926". The American Statistician 34 (1): 1–7. doi:10.2307/2682986. JSTOR 2682986. 
  3. ^ Yates, F (June 1964). "Sir Ronald Fisher and the Design of Experiments". Biometrics 20 (2): 307–321. doi:10.2307/2528399. JSTOR 2528399. 
  4. ^ Stanley, Julian C. (1966). "The Influence of Fisher's "The Design of Experiments" on Educational Research Thirty Years Later". American Educational Research Journal 3 (3): 223–229. doi:10.3102/00028312003003223. JSTOR 1161806. 
  5. ^ OED, "null hypothesis," first usage: 1935 R. A. Fisher, The Design of Experiments ii. 19, "We may speak of this hypothesis as the 'null hypothesis', and it should be noted that the null hypothesis is never proved or established, but is possibly disproved, in the course of experimentation."

References[edit]