The Devil and Sherlock Holmes

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The Devil and Sherlock Holmes
Author David Grann
Country United States
Language English
Genre Nonfiction
Publisher Doubleday
Publication date
2010
Published in English
March 9, 2010
Media type Print (hardcover)
Pages 350 pp
ISBN 978-0-385-51792-8
LC Class PN4874.G672A25 2010
Preceded by The Lost City of Z

The Devil and Sherlock Holmes: Tales of Murder, Madness, and Obsession (2010) is a collection of 12 essays by American journalist David Grann.

Essays[edit]

The essays were previously published between 2000 and 2009 in The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, The New Republic and The Atlantic and have been "updated and revised".[1] The stories are about real-life mysteries, a "mosaic of ambition, deception, passion, and folly."[2]

Anthologies[edit]

Three of the stories have been optioned for filming rights, and five of the stories have been collected in other "best" anthology volumes.[3] It is Grann's second book, after The Lost City of Z (2009) published the previous year, and his first collected anthology of essays.

Critical response[edit]

In The New York Times, Sam Roberts called the book "riveting."[4] Writing in Entertainment Weekly, critic Keith Staskiewicz gave the collection a grade of A: "This collection of David Grann's nonfiction, much of it from The New Yorker, is by turns horrifying, hilarious, and outlandish... These straightforward tales grip you as unrelentingly as the suckered appendages of the giant squid Grann attempts to track down in 'The Squid Hunter.' You might feel that some of the pieces skirt credibility, but remember, as Holmes himself once said, Life is infinitely stranger than anything which the mind of man could invent.'"[5]

Contents[edit]

Chapter Number Part Chapter Title Year Published Source(s) Related articles Notes
01 Part 1[6] Mysterious Circumstances 2004 The New Yorker, December 13, 2004.[7][8]
The Best American Crime Writing 2005
Richard Lancelyn Green, Category:Sherlock Holmes
02 Part 1 Trial by Fire 2009 The New Yorker, September 7, 2009.[9] Cameron Todd Willingham
03 Part 1 The Chameleon 2008 The New Yorker, August 11, 2008.[10] Frédéric Bourdin
04 Part 1 True Crime 2008 The New Yorker, February 11, 2008.[11]
The Best American Crime Reporting 2009
Krystian Bala Optioned for film by Focus Films.[12]
05 Part 1 Which Way Did He Run? 2002 The New York Times Magazine, January 13, 2002.[13] September 11 attacks
06 Part 2[14] The Squid Hunter 2004 The New Yorker, May 24, 2004.[15] Giant squid, Steve O'Shea
07 Part 2 City of Water 2003 The New Yorker, September 1, 2003.[16] Sandhog, Water infrastructure of New York City Optioned for film by Paramount.[12]
08 Part 2 The Old Man and the Gun 2003 The New Yorker, January 27, 2003.[17]
The Best American Crime Writing 2004
Forrest Tucker Optioned for film by Identity Films.[12]
09 Part 2 Stealing Time 2005 The New Yorker, September 12, 2005.[18]
The Best American Sports Writing 2006
Rickey Henderson
10 Part 3[19] The Brand 2004 The New Yorker, February 16, 2004.[20] Aryan Brotherhood
11 Part 3 Crimetown, U.S.A. 2000 The New Republic, July 10, 2000.[21]
Wise Guys: Stories of Mobsters from Jersey to Vegas[22]
James Traficant
12 Part 3 Giving the 'Devil' His Due 2001 The Atlantic, June, 2001.[23] Toto Constant

Editions[edit]

  • Grann, David. The Devil and Sherlock Holmes: Tales of Murder, Madness, and Obsession. March 9, 2010. Doubleday. ISBN 978-0-385-51792-8 (hardcover, first edition).

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Deception And 'The Devil And Sherlock Holmes'", NPR, Talk of the Nation, March 9, 2010.
  2. ^ The Devil and Sherlock Holmes, back-cover blurb, first edition.
  3. ^ See references in chart in this article.
  4. ^ Sam Roberts, "Tales of Obsessions and Battles That Shaped the City," The New York Times, April 4, 2010.
  5. ^ Keith Staskiewicz, "The Devil and Sherlock Holmes," Entertainment Weekly, March 10, 2010.
  6. ^ Part 1 motto: "Any truth is better than indefinite doubt." (Sherlock Holmes in "The Adventure of the Yellow Face")
  7. ^ "Mysterious Circumstances" (abstract), The New Yorker, December 13, 2004.
  8. ^ "Mysterious Circumstances" (excerpt), The New Yorker, December 13, 2004. Via "Accessmylibrary.com"
  9. ^ "Trial by Fire", The New Yorker, September 7, 2009.
  10. ^ "The Chameleon", The New Yorker, August 11, 2008.
  11. ^ "True Crime" (abstract), The New Yorker, February 11, 2008.
  12. ^ a b c "Mastromauro finds Identity", Variety, February 15, 2010.
  13. ^ "Which Way Did He Run?", The New York Times Magazine, January 13, 2002.
  14. ^ Part 2 motto: "A strange enigma is man!" (Sherlock Holmes in "The Sign of the Four")
  15. ^ "The Squid Hunter", The New Yorker, May 24, 2004.
  16. ^ "City of Water" (abstract), The New Yorker, September 1, 2003.
  17. ^ "The Old Man and the Gun" (abstract), The New Yorker, January 27, 2003.
  18. ^ "Stealing Time" (abstract), The New Yorker, September 12, 2005.
  19. ^ Part 3 motto: "All that was monstrous and inconceivably wicked in the universe." (Dr. Watson in "The Adventure of the Devil's Foot")
  20. ^ "The Brand" (abstract), The New Yorker, February 16, 2004
  21. ^ "Crimetown, U.S.A.", The New Republic, July 10, 2000
  22. ^ Clint Willis. Wise Guys: Stories of Mobsters from Jersey to Vegas, 2003. pg.221
  23. ^ "Giving the 'Devil' His Due", The Atlantic, June, 2001

External links[edit]