The Devil and his Grandmother

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"The Devil and his Grandmother" (or "The Dragon and His Grandmother") is a German fairy tale collected by the Brothers Grimm, number 125.

Andrew Lang included it in The Yellow Fairy Book.

A version of this tale also appears in A Book of Dragons by Ruth Manning-Sanders.

It is Aarne-Thompson type 812, the devil's riddle.

Synopsis[edit]

Three soldiers could not live on their pay, and so attempted to desert by hiding in a cornfield. When the army did not march away, they were soon caught between starving or emerging to face execution. A dragon flew by, offered to save them if they served him for seven years. When they agreed, the dragon carried them off. However, the dragon was in fact the devil. He gave them a whip with which they could make money, but said at the end of seven years, they were his unless they could guess a riddle in which case they would be free and could keep the whip.

At the end of the seven years, two of the soldiers were morose at the thought of their fate. An old woman advised them to go down to a cottage for help. The third soldier, who did not fear the riddle went down and met the devil's grandmother. She was pleased with his manner and hid him in the cellar. When the demon came, she questioned him, and the soldier learned the answers.

The demon found them at the end of the seven years, and told he would take them to hell and serve them a meal. The riddle was: what was the meat, the silver spoon, and the wineglass for that meal. The answers were a dead sea-cat in the North Sea, a whale rib, and an old horse's hoof.

So the soldiers escaped and kept the whip.

Popular culture[edit]

  • The Devil and his Grandmother is featured in Grimm's Fairy Tale Classics under its "Grimm Masterpiece Theater" season where the story was referred to as "The Naughty Spirit."
  • The story inspired Mike Mognola's fifth issue of his series Hellboy In Hell caled "The Three Gold Whips"

See also[edit]

External links[edit]