The Duel After the Masquerade

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The Duel After the Masquerade
Jean-Léon Gérôme - The Duel After the Masquerade - Walters 3751.jpg
Artist Jean-Léon Gérôme
Year 1857-1859
Type Oil on canvas
Dimensions 39.1 cm × 56.3 cm (15.4 in × 22.2 in)
Location The Walters Art Museum, Baltimore

The Duel After the Masquerade is a painting by the French artist Jean-Léon Gérôme, currently part of The Walters Art Museum collection.

History[edit]

In 1859, William Thompson Walters, purchased The Duel After the Masquerade at the National Academy of Design in New York for $2,500.[1] The painting is a replica of the Suite d'un bal masque painted by Gérôme for the duc d'Aumale and exhibited at Gambart's London Gallery in 1858.[1] The original is part of the collection of the Musée Condé in Chantilly, France.[2] It was not unusual for artists to replicate their own paintings and other versions had also been painted for Prince Alexander[disambiguation needed] of Russia and for the Ali Pacha[disambiguation needed]. Walters asked the manager of the exhibition at the National Academy of Design for a letter of authentication from Gérôme and a comparison of the work he had purchased to the original.[1]

The original became famous almost overnight with the critics of the salon speculating about Gerome's sources for the incident depicted in the painting.[3] In a poll taken in the winter of 1909-1910, Baltimoreans were asked to identify their fifty-five favorite works of art and The Duel After the Masquerade topped the list.[1]

Composition[edit]

The scene is set on a gray winters morning in the Bois de Boulogne. A man dressed as a Pierrot has been mortally wounded and has collapsed into the arms of a Duke de Guise. A surgeon, dressed as a doge of Venice, tries to stop the flow of blood, while a Domino holds his head. The winner of the duel, dressed as an American Indian, walks away with his second, Harlequin. In the background, carriages wait in the distance, offering a getaway if the police were to arrive. The bizarreness of the scene in regards to the brightly colored costumes turns to pathos at the sight of blood on the Pierrot.[3]

Exhibition History[edit]

  • From Ingres to Gauguin: French Nineteenth Century Paintings Owned in Maryland. Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore. 1951.
  • The Taste of Maryland: Art Collecting in Maryland 1800-1934. The Walters Art Gallery, Baltimore. 1984.
  • Highlights from the Collection. The Walters Art Gallery, Baltimore. 1998-2001.
  • Triumph of French Painting: Masterpieces from Ingres to Matisse. Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore; Philbrook Museum of Art, Tulsa; Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach; Royal Academy of Arts, London; *Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo; Dayton Art Institute, Dayton. 2000-2002.
  • A Magnificent Age: Masterpieces from the Walters Art Museum, Baltimore. The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City; Mint Museum of Art, Charlotte; The Walters Art Museum, Baltimore. 2002-2004.
  • Déjà Vu? Revealing Repetition in French Masterpieces. The Walters Art Museum, Baltimore; Phoenix Art Museum, Phoenix. 2007-2008.
  • The Spectacular Art of Jean-Léon Gérôme. Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid; J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; Musee D'Orsay, Paris. 2010-2011.[4]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Johnston, William R. (1999). William and Henry Walters : the reticent collectors. Baltimore, Md. [u.a.]: Johns Hopkins Univ. Press. p. 17. ISBN 0801860407. 
  2. ^ "Musée Condé". Suites d’un bal masqué. Retrieved 8 November 2012. 
  3. ^ a b Ackerman, Gerald M. (2008). jean-Léon Gérôme : his life, his work ([English ed.]. ed.). Paris: ACR Editions. p. 50. ISBN 2867701015. 
  4. ^ The Walters Art Museum -The Duel After the Masquerade