The Foot Fist Way

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The Foot Fist Way
Foot fist way.jpg
Promotional film poster
Directed by Jody Hill
Produced by Erin Gates
Jody Hill
Robbie Hill
Jennifer Chikes
Written by Jody Hill
Danny McBride
Ben Best
Starring Danny McBride
Ben Best
Mary Jane Bostic
Music by Pyramid
The Dynamite Brothers
Cinematography Brian Mandle
Edited by Zene Baker
Jeff Seibenick
Production
  company
MTV Films
Will Ferrell and Adam McKay
You Know I Can't Kiss You, Inc.
Distributed by Paramount Vantage (USA)
Alliance Films (Canada)
Momentum Pictures (UK)
Release date(s)
Running time 85 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Budget $79,000[1]
Box office $245,292

The Foot Fist Way is a 2006 low-budget comedy film directed by Jody Hill and starring Danny McBride. Will Ferrell and Adam McKay's production company, Gary Sanchez Productions, picked up distribution rights to the film and hoped for it to achieve a Napoleon Dynamite-like success.[1] It premiered in 2006 at The Los Angeles Film Festival and was screened at Sundance that same year. The film was released on DVD in 2008.

Plot[edit]

Fred Simmons (Danny McBride) is a fourth-degree black belt in Taekwondo who runs his own dojo in a small North Carolina town. He styles himself a big shot, driving a Ferrari and extolling the virtues of Taekwondo to potential new students, but loses his confidence after he discovers that his wife, Suzie (Mary Jane Bostic) gave her boss a handjob after a drunken office party. In order to restore his confidence, he attends a martial arts expo to meet his idol, B movie action star Chuck "the Truck" Wallace (Ben Best) who in reality turns out to be a dirty and drunken mess. After nearly brawling with Chuck's seedy friends, Fred persuades Chuck to make an appearance at his upcoming Taekwondo belt test and then parties with his friends and students in Chuck's hotel room. Fred returns home and sells his Ferrari to pay Chuck's $10,000 appearance fee. Shortly thereafter, Suzie returns to Fred after losing her job. On the night before the belt test, Fred catches Suzie having sex with Chuck on his own couch. Fred challenges Chuck to a fight, but is eventually beaten and driven off. The next morning, Suzie once again asks to be taken back, but Fred rejects her and urinates on his wedding ring. Fred arrives at the test late, battered and bruised, but with his confidence restored. When Chuck arrives for his appearance, Fred challenges him to a martial arts demonstration of board breaking, which he wins. At the following belt ceremony, Fred reads a new student pledge that he has written, which outlines the goals and responsibilities of Taekwondo.

Cast[edit]

  • Danny McBride as Fred Simmons, a black belt and instructor of Taekwondo in a small southern town.
  • Ben Best as Chuck "The Truck" Wallace, a B movie action star. Best is also a member of the music band Pyramid, who supplied songs to the film's soundtrack. Other members of the band played bit parts as Chuck's friends at his party.
  • Mary Jane Bostic as Suzie Simmons, Fred's unfaithful, spandex-clad wife.
  • Spencer Moreno as Julio, Fred's overweight adolescent second-in-command at the dojang.
  • Carlos Lopez IV as Henry, a meek youth who finds self-confidence through Taekwondo.
  • Jody Hill as Mike McAlister, Fred's intense friend and fellow Taekwondo black belt.

All martial artists in the film, excluding McBride and Best, were played by true Taekwondo practitioners, many from Concord Taekwondo in Concord NC.

Promotion[edit]

McBride appeared as a guest on Late Night with Conan O'Brien on February 26, 2008 as the character Fred Simmons.[2] Many viewers were not familiar with either the character or the actor and as a result there was initially much speculation as to whether the seemingly disastrous Tae Kwon Do demonstration, during which Simmons asked for a "redo" after a failed block-splitting attempt - and awkward interview, during which he repeatedly lashed out at fellow guest Will Ferrell for dancing around in a sexual nature during his interview segment earlier, were real or staged. Among the only immediate clues to suggest the interview was a setup was when the website for the film was flashed onscreen during the interview.

Critical reception[edit]

Variety gave the film a fairly positive review stating that the film is "crying out to be discovered by midnight movie mavens".[3] It currently holds a 57%, "Rotten" rating on review aggregator website Rotten Tomatoes, based on 76 reviews. The website Metacritic, which averages leading film critics from across the United States, gave the film a 63 out of 100 based on 22 reviews, which is considered "generally favorable."[4]

References[edit]

External links[edit]