The Gaited Horse (magazine)

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The Gaited Horse is a defunct international magazine catering to people interested in gaited horses. Originally based in tiny Elk, Washington, it soon moved to the small town of Deer Park, Washington. The magazine was co-founded by Rhonda Hart (later Rhonda Hart Poe, now Rhonda Massingham Hart), an author of multiple horse, garden, and how-to books, Alyson Stockham, a Peruvian Paso horse breeder, and Becky Turner, a freelance artist and sculputor, who left in the early days of the magazine to pursue her artistry.[1]

Issues[edit]

Issues were published quarterly. Issues of the magazine offered guest-written articles by well known experts in the field such as Lee Zeigler (author of Easy Gaited Horses), and Liz Graves, an expert horse trainer and clinician who specializes in gaited horses. [2]

Controversy[edit]

The Gaited Horse covered several controversial issues in the horse world, such as soring, the illegal practice of intentionally harming horses in order to effect their gaits. The biggest controversy at the time seemed to be battling the notion so many non-gaited horse people had that horses had to be forced to gait (via things such as soring). Most of the magazine was dedicated to showcasing naturally gaited horses. [3]

End of Publication[edit]

After a decade in the business, the magazine folded, due mostly to lack of subscription sales and advertising, in spite of being popular mostly in the Southern United States and Europe. The magazine published a "Sunset issue,"their way of saying goodbye. [4]The Sunset issue was the most successful to date.

Copies of many issues are still available, including the Sunset issue, and another very popular issue about Elvis Presley's horses. [5]

Rhonda Hart is still involved in the publishing industry, contributing to other horse publications, writing the occasional gardening book, and screenwriting. Alyson Stockham still breeds Peruvian Pasos, as well as a breed she invented called the Fox-Uvian, a Missouri Foxtrotter Peruvian Paso cross. Becky Turner still practices her art.[6]

References[edit]

[7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12]

External links[edit]