The Girl Who Came Late

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
The Girl Who Came Late
Directed by Kathy Mueller
Produced by Ben Gannon
Written by Saturday Rosenberg
Starring Miranda Otto
Martin Kemp
Gia Carides
Music by Todd Hunter
Johanna Pigott
Cinematography Andrew Lesnie
Edited by Robert Gibson
Distributed by Beyond Films
Release dates
1991
Running time
82 minutes
Country Australia
Language English
Box office A$24,885 (Australia)[1]

The Girl Who Came Late aka Daydream Believer is a 1991 Australian romantic comedy film starring Miranda Otto, Martin Kemp and Gia Carides; and directed by Kathy Mueller. Otto was nominated for an Australian Film Institute Award for "Best Actress in a Lead Role".[2] Otto was later Éowyn in The Lord of the Rings and starred in War of the Worlds.

Plot[edit]

The 'Girl' of the title is Nell Tiscowitz (Otto), a struggling actress with an affinity for horses.[3] She meets wealthy Rock music promoter and stable owner Digby Olsen (Kemp bass guitarist of Spandau Ballet). Nell's best friend and flatmate, Wendy (Carides, later in Strictly Ballroom and Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me) provides dubious love-lorn advice. After Nell uses her 'telepathy' to help Digby tame horses they eventually fall in love.

Production[edit]

The film was one of five films financed by the FFC Film Fund in 1990. Otto was cast after over 200 girls auditioned; it was only her second major role, after Emma's War. The role of Digby entailed looking at actors from London and Los Angeles; after Martin Kemp was cast, the occupation of the character was changed from theatre entrepreneur to rock promoter.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Australian Films at the Australian Box Office", Film Victoria accessed 12 November 2012
  2. ^ "The Girl Who Came Late (1991) – Awards". Internet Movie Database. Retrieved 28 October 2007. 
  3. ^ "Daydream Believer Press Kit" (PDF). Beyond Films. Archived from the original on 28 September 2007. Retrieved 28 October 2007. 
  4. ^ Eva Friedman, "Kathy Mueller's Daydream Believer", Cinema Papers, May–June 1992 p16-18

External links[edit]