The Girlie Show (Channel 4)

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The Girlie Show
Presented by Sarah Cawood
Claire Gorham
Rachel Williams
Sara Cox
Country of origin United Kingdom
Original language(s) English
No. of series 2
No. of episodes 12
Production
Running time 60 mins
Broadcast
Original channel Channel 4
Chronology
Preceded by The Word

The Girlie Show was a British television programme that aired on Channel 4. Its presenters were Sarah Cawood, Claire Gorham, American model Rachel Williams, and in her first presenting job, Sara Cox.[1][2] The programme ran for two series in 1996 and 1997.

Format[edit]

Its magazine format allowed for interviews, live music, features, and stunts involving studio guests and the live audience.

Originally broadcast in the old The Word time slot of 11pm on a Friday night, The Girlie Show later occupied Channel 4's traditional "post-pub" time slot. As with The Word, the late night air-time meant that guests and presenters encouraged each other to be controversial. In the tradition of The Word, the show's content and its presenters were heavily hyped as being more edgy, dangerous, and 'ballsy' than other programmes on British Television.

The show also featured a group of four "Twentysomething" males from the north-east of England called "The Naked Apes" (named after the book by Desmond Morris of the same name). This was an early format for what would later become "reality TV", and showed what "lads" got up to when they hung out together. The four were filmed each week in a variety of situations including a trip to Amsterdam, visiting a gay night club, and going to the greyhound races dressed up as the "Reservoir Dogs". The group gained notoriety due to continued scenes of drinking and their attitudes towards life and women.

The series was notable for being the first to feature the girl group Spice Girls.[1]

There was considerable tabloid backlash against the show due to its often amateurish production standards[3] - the presenters had little experience of live television. It was similarly castigated in the broadsheets as 'witless'.[citation needed] Although the intention of the producers was to cash in on the Girl Power and ladette phenomena, feminist commentators complained the show's style and content appealed to male chauvinistic stereotypes.[citation needed] Several so-called practical jokes on members of the audience were also clearly staged. Channel 4 subsequently placed the show at number 80 in its 100 Greatest TV Moments from Hell list.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Imagiz @ Rapido Television. "The Girlie Show - Series 1". Rapido.co.uk. Retrieved 2009-08-21. 
  2. ^ [1][dead link]
  3. ^ Rees, Jasper (1996-02-03). "TELEVISION The Girlie Show, C4 - Arts & Entertainment". London: The Independent. Retrieved 2009-08-21. 

External links[edit]