Global Simplicity Index

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The Global Simplicity Index 2011 is the first ever study to calculate the cost of complexity in the world's largest organisations.[1][2] The research was conducted jointly by management consultancy, Simplicity, and Warwick Business School. The Global Simplicity Index has identified that the world's largest companies lose an average of 10.2% of their profits (EBITDA) as a result of unnecessary complexity.[3]

The Global Simplicity Index has identified that complexity occurs in five key areas of an organisation: people, processes, organisational design, strategy, and products and services.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ James, Mick. "Putting a price on complexity". Top Consultant. 
  2. ^ Carly, Chynoweth. "How to avoid a tangled web". The Sunday Times. 
  3. ^ Collinson, Simon. "Reducing complexity: Should finance directors be leading the way?". Director of Finance Online. 
  4. ^ "More about The Global Simplicity Index". Simplicity Partnership. Retrieved 13 May 2011.