The Hunger for More

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The Hunger for More
Studio album by Lloyd Banks
Released June 29, 2004
Recorded 2003-2004
Genre Hardcore Rap, Gangsta Rap
Length 59:28
Label
Producer 50 Cent (exec.), Sha Money XL (exec.), Eminem, Havoc, Ron Browz, Thayod Ausar, K1 Mil, Hi-Tek, Timbaland, Danja, Diaz Brothers, Scram Jones, Chad Beatz Tastemaker Music, Greg "Ginx" Doby, Black Jeruz
Lloyd Banks chronology
Beg for Mercy
(2003)
The Hunger For More
(2004)
Rotten Apple
(2006)
Alternative cover
Singles from The Hunger For More
  1. "On Fire"
    Released: April 15, 2004
  2. "I'm So Fly"
    Released: July 13, 2004
  3. "Karma"
    Released: October 19, 2004

The Hunger for More is the debut album by G-Unit rapper Lloyd Banks, released June 29, 2004 on G-Unit Records and Interscope Records. Banks had been featured on 50 Cent's multi-platinum 2003 album Get Rich or Die Tryin', and on G-Unit's Beg for Mercy in November of the same year. And he had recently been named Mixtape Artist of the Year at the Mixtape Awards—for his appearances on G-Unit mixtapes as well as his own Money in the Bank series—when The Hunger for More was released by G-Unit Records and Interscope Records. In 2010, a sequel album, The Hunger for More 2 was released.

Background[edit]

The hit singles from this album include "On Fire", "I'm So Fly", and "Karma". Features on this album include 50 Cent, Tony Yayo, Young Buck, Eminem, Snoop Dogg, Nate Dogg, and The Game.

During the first week of The Hunger For More's release, a distribution house in Manhattan was robbed of approximately eight boxes of the CDs (200 copies). A New York record store had nearly 100 copies of the CD stolen from its racks by a single perpetrator on the album's first day in stores, though they were later recovered.[1]

Concept[edit]

During an interview Lloyd Banks explained the reason behind naming the album. He said:

When I say The Hunger for More, it could be referring to more success. It could be more money. Or Respect. More power. More understanding. All those things lead up to that hunger for more, because my more isn't everybody else's more. I feel like I made it already, because I got already what everybody on the corners of the neighborhood I grew up in is striving to get.[2]

Recordings[edit]

We had a studio on the tour Bus. I wrote on the road, going through different situations, constantly touring. 50 was out there, Snoop Dogg was out there, Busta Rhymes, Jay-Z, a lot of people and I'm tryin' to find my lane at the same time as goin' through all the ins and outs.[3]
I recorded about 50 tracks and I had 50 choose the tracks for the album. “Chips it down” meaning that when the finances are not there, you realize that you need money for everything, and you know that money can change everything. It is talking about the move from having nothing to having all the money and the cars and jewelry.[4] When I'm doin' records for my album, I'm givin' you the same thing I'm givin' you on the mixtapes, but I'm also givin' material that I don't care about getting an (oooh or wow) at the crowd. I do it to basically to tell you stuff you need to know. You understand. If I said you need to know this is what to expect from my neighborhood its kinda like a message at the same time you see good news travel slower than bad news. Yanno so if you grow up in the suburbs or you out of the country or whatever maybe my personal experiences will make you appreciate your neighborhood better. So it's certain things that when I make a record or my album where I'm tellin' you I don't care about your *oooohs and ahhhhs* I just feel like you need to know this.[4]

Reception[edit]

Critical response[edit]

Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
AllHipHop 3.5/5 stars [5]
AllMusic 3.5/5 stars [6]
Blender 3/5 stars [7]
E! Online B−[8]
HipHopDX 4/5 stars [9]
Los Angeles Times 2.5/4 stars [10]
RapReviews (8/10) [11]
Rolling Stone 3/5 stars [12]
Vibe 3.5/5 stars [13][14]
The Village Voice (mixed) [15]

Upon its release, The Hunger for More received positive reviews from most music critics.[16] At Metacritic, which assigns a normalized rating out of 100 to reviews from mainstream critics, the album received an average score of 66, based on 10 reviews, which indicates "generally favorable reviews".[16]

Commercial performance[edit]

It was released in 2004 and debuted at number 1 on the Billboard 200 The Hunger for More, opened at #1 on Billboard's albums sales chart, with week-one sales topping 433,000.[17] Banks had the feeling of having the album reach number 1 in the United States. "That's the kind of debut that veteran artists have," says Banks. "That showed me that following 50's moves and studying the way that he played the game had put me in an incredible position." The album has since been certified 4x Platinum by the RIAA.[18][19] The album also achieved Platinum status in Canada[20]

Track listing[edit]

No. Title Producer(s) Length
1. "Ain't No Click" (featuring Tony Yayo) Havoc 4:25
2. "Playboy" (featuring DJ Whoo Kid) Ron Browz 4:32
3. "Warrior"   Thayod Ausar 2:47
4. "On Fire" (featuring 50 Cent) K1 Mil, Eminem, Luis Resto 3:07
5. "I Get High" (featuring 50 Cent & Snoop Dogg) Hi-Tek 4:09
6. "I'm So Fly"   Timbaland, Danja 4:00
7. "Work Magic" (featuring Young Buck) Scram Jones 4:27
8. "If You So Gangsta"   Chad Beat, Sha Money XL 4:49
9. "Warrior Part 2" (featuring Eminem, 50 Cent & Nate Dogg) Eminem 3:38
10. "Karma" (featuring Avant) Greg 'Ginx' Doby 4:38
11. "When the Chips Are Down" (featuring The Game) Black Jeruz, Sha Money XL 3:31
12. "Til the End" (featuring Nate Dogg) Eminem 5:09
13. "Die One Day"   Baby Grand 3:14
14. "South Side Story"   Diaz Brothers 4:10

Special edition[edit]

  • The album was also released in a special edition, which featured a bonus track and different packaging (including a CD booklet on dollar bill-style paper). It also included a 25-minute DVD with the video for "My Buddy", a clip for "Smile" and "A Day in the Life of Lloyd Banks."[2]
  • The Bonus Track on The Special Edition, "Just Another Day" Contains lyrical interpolations of Queen Latifah's song of the same name.

Charts[edit]

Charts (2004)[21][22] Peak
position
Dutch Albums Chart 52
French Albums Chart 37
German Albums Chart 45
Irish Albums Chart 36
Swiss Albums Chart 65
UK Albums Chart 15
Canadian Albums Chart 2
U.S. Billboard 200 1
U.S. Billboard Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums 1
U.S. Billboard Top Rap Albums 1

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Kiss of Death by Jadakiss
Billboard 200 number-one album
July 17–30, 2004
Succeeded by
License to Chill by Jimmy Buffett