The Idler (1892–1911)

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This article is about the 19th-century literary magazine. For other publications with this name, see The Idler (disambiguation).
Cover for bound volumes of The Idler 1892 onwards.

The Idler was an illustrated monthly magazine published in Great Britain from 1892 to 1911. It was founded by the author Robert Barr, who brought in the humorist Jerome K. Jerome as co-editor, and its contributors included many of the leading writers and illustrators of the time.

Content[edit]

The Idler generally catered to the popular taste, printing light pieces and sensational fiction. The magazine published short stories, serialised novels, humour pieces, poetry, memoirs, travel writing, book and theatre reviews and interviews. It also included a monthly feature called 'The Idlers' Club,' in which a number of writers would offer their views on a particular topic.

Most of The Idler's contributors were popular and prolific writers of the time. Some of them, such as Rudyard Kipling and Mark Twain, are still read today.

Contributors[edit]

Writers[edit]

Artists[edit]

External links[edit]

Vol. 3, iss. 13, February 1893.
Vol. 3, April 1893.
Vol. 3, May 1893.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "The Idler" Vol.2 Aug. 1892 - Jan. 1893