The Illustrated Police News

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This article is about the defunct British newspaper. For the similarly named defunct US newspaper, see Illustrated Police News (Boston).
The Illustrated Police News
Illustrated Police News - Jack the Ripper.jpg
L. Forbes Winslow conjures up the secret actions of Jack the Ripper, from the Illustrated Police News
Type Weekly newspaper
Format Tabloid
Founded 1864
Ceased publication 1938
Headquarters London

The Illustrated Police News was a weekly illustrated newspaper which was one of the earliest British tabloids. It featured sensational and melodramatic reports and illustrations of murders and hangings and was a direct descendant of the execution broadsheets of the 18th century.

History[edit]

The Illustrated Police News was inspired by The Illustrated London News, which had been launched in 1842 and revealed that newspapers with illustrations could achieve very high sales. First published in 1864, The Illustrated Police News ceased publication in 1938.

Its standards of illustration and tone were reminiscent of an earlier publication, The Newgate Calendar, and the popular "Penny dreadfuls". It gained a reputation for sensationalism during the Jack the Ripper murders of 1888.

Around the turn of the 20th century The Illustrated Police News ran numerous articles dealing with the "alien immigration question" that promoted xenophobic attitudes and paranoia amongs its mostly working-class readership.[1]

In popular culture[edit]

The 2011 film Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows includes scenes in which characters are reading copies of the Illustrated Police News.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Maunder, Andrew; Moore, Grace (2004). Victorian Crime, Madness and Sensation. Ashgate Publishing. p. 225. ISBN 0-7546-4060-4. 

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Media related to The Illustrated Police News at Wikimedia Commons