The Lloyd Bridges Show

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The Lloyd Bridges Show
Lloyd Bridges and Mary Murphy Lloyd Bridges Show 1963.JPG
Lloyd Bridges and Mary Murphy in episode "My Daddy Can Beat Your Daddy" (1963)
Genre Anthology drama
Written by Robert Towne
Directed by John Cassavetes
Jeffrey Hayden
Don Taylor
Starring Lloyd Bridges
Composer(s) Rudy Schrager
Country of origin United States
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 1
No. of episodes 34
Production
Executive producer(s) Aaron Spelling
Producer(s) Everett Chambers
Running time 22–24 minutes
Broadcast
Original channel CBS
Picture format Black-and-white
Audio format Monaural
Original run September 11, 1962 (1962-09-11) – May 28, 1963 (1963-05-28)

The Lloyd Bridges Show is an American anthology drama series produced by Aaron Spelling, which aired on CBS from September 11, 1962 to May 28, 1963, starring and hosted by Lloyd Bridges.

Synopsis[edit]

In the first fourteen episodes, from September to January, Bridges played the author Adam Shepherd who was transformed into the main character of each episode. In January, the program, considered in retrospect to have been highly innovative, became a straightforward anthology with Bridges hosting each episode, much as Ronald W. Reagan had done with the General Electric Theater and Jane Wyman had prevailed with Jane Wyman Presents. The program featured Bridges's sons, Jeff and Beau Bridges, in occasional guest-starring roles.[1]

The premiere episode is entitled "Wheresoever I Enter". "A Pair of Boots" casts Bridges as a Confederate whose truce with the Union Army is threatened by a southern soldier's desire to reclaim a pair of shoes stolen by a northerner. Co-stars in the episode are son Beau Bridges. Royal Dano, and Seymour Cassel. In the episode "My Daddy Can Beat Your Daddy", authored by Robert Towne, the screenwriter of Chinatown, Bridges plays an aging boxer fighting a match against his own son. Co-stars in the segment are son Jeff Bridges, Gary Lockwood, and Mary Murphy.[2]

Broadcast history[edit]

The Lloyd Bridges Show, a Four Star production, aired on Tuesday at 8 p.m. Eastern time; summer rebroadcasts aired from June to September 3, 1963. The series aired opposite the first season of ABC's military drama Combat!, starring Rick Jason and Vic Morrow, and the last season of NBC's western series Laramie starring John Smith, Robert Fuller, and Spring Byington. It followed rebroadcasts of the half-hour version of CBS's Gunsmoke under the title Marshal Dillon, starring James Arness.[3]

Notable guest stars[edit]

Other guest stars included:

Episodes[edit]

Episode # Episode title Original airdate
1-1 "Wheresoever I Enter" September 11, 1962
1-2 "El Medico" September 18, 1962
1-3 "My Child Is Yet a Stranger" September 25, 1962
1-4 "A Pair of Boots" October 2, 1962
1-5 "Mr. Penningham's Machine" October 9, 1962
1-6 "Just Married" October 16, 1962
1-7 "Testing Ground" October 23, 1962
1-8 "War Song" October 30, 1962
1-9 "Yankee Stay Here" November 13, 1962
1-10 "The Miracle of Mesa Verde" November 20, 1962
1-11 "Little Man, Big Bridge" November 27, 1962
1-12 "Permission Granted" December 4, 1962
1-13 "Gentleman in Blue" December 11, 1962
1-14 "The Sound of Angels" December 18, 1962
1-15 "Now, You Take Your Average Rock" December 25, 1962
1-16 "The Scapegoat" January 1, 1963
1-17 "The Wonder of Wanda" January 8, 1963
1-18 "My Daddy Can Beat Your Daddy" January 22, 1963
1-19 " A Game for Alternate Mondays" January 29, 1963
1-20 "A Personal Matter" February 5, 1963
1-21 "The Skippy Mannox Story" February 12, 1963
1-22 "The Rising Moon" February 19, 1963
1-23 "To Walk with Stars" February 26, 1963
1-24 "The Courtship" March 5, 1963
1-25 "Gym in January" March 12, 1963
1-26 "The Sheridan Square" March 19, 1963
1-27 "Last Lion" April 2, 1963
1-28 "Tyrees of Capitol Hill" April 9, 1963
1-29 "Waltz of the Two Commuters" April 16, 1963
1-30 "Freedom Is for Those Who Want It" April 30, 1963
1-31 "The Ramp" May 7, 1963
1-32 "Without Wheat There Is No Bread" May 14, 1963
1-33 "The Epidemic" May 21, 1963
1-34 "Afternoon of the Champion" May 28, 1963

References[edit]

  1. ^ Alex McNeil, Total Television, New York: Penguin Books, 1996, 4th ed., p. 487
  2. ^ Fretts, Bruce (July 25, 1997). "Choice Reruns". Entertainment Weekly.com. Retrieved January 22, 2009. 
  3. ^ 1962-1963 American network television schedule, in appendix of Total Television

External links[edit]