The Lost Future

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The Lost Future
The Lost Future.jpg
DVD cover
Distributed by Syfy (US)
Tandem Communications (Germany)
Directed by Mikael Salomon
Produced by Moritz Polter
Written by Jonas Bauer
Starring Sean Bean
Corey Sevier
Sam Claflin
Music by Michael Richard Plowman
Petr Vcelicka
Cinematography Paul Gilpin
Editing by Allan Lee
Production company RTL Television
Syfy
Tandem Communications
Film AfrikaWorldwide
Budget $7,000,000[1]
Country South Africa
Germany
Language English
Release date
  • November 13, 2010 (2010-11-13)[2]
Running time 91 minutes

The Lost Future is a 2010 South African-German[3] post-apocalyptic film from Syfy, directed by Mikael Salomon and written by Jonas Bauer. The film stars Sean Bean, Corey Sevier and Sam Claflin. It was released on DVD on September 27, 2011.

Plot[edit]

In post-apocalyptic Columbia, a group of survivors led by Uri and the ancients are organized as a tribe, in a primitive society without technology and lives in a small village in the Grey Rock National Park surrounded by beasts that transmit a disease that transforms the victims into mutants. Uri's son Savan is the best hunter of their tribe and successor of his father, while Kaleb is the best tracker. Kaleb and his sister Miru (Eleanor Tomlinson) are the only literate survivors. Their father Jaret believed other survivors might exist outside the park and encourages them to investigate this. Kaleb, a dreamer, is secretly in love with Savan's woman, Dorel. When the beasts attack Uri's hamlet, a group runs to a cave and blocks the entrance with logs. Kaleb saves Dorel from a beast, at which point they become romantically involved while Savan looks on.

Out of the blue, the stranger Amal approaches the trio and invites them to join his family, composed of his wife Neenah and their son Persk, who live in the outskirts of Grey Rock protected by a river. Soon Amal discloses to them that Jaret had found the formula of a yellow powder that cures the sick people. However, the ruthless Gagen had stolen the yellow powder and kept it with him. Amal, Savan, Kaleb and Dorel travel together to find Gagen and bring the yellow powder to their tribe. However, Amal is later wounded and the other three continue on their quest to find the yellow powder and return it rightfully to their village. During this perilous attempt, Savan is killed by an enraged Gagen, who is later killed by Kaleb.

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

The Lost Future was filmed in and around Cape Town, South Africa.[1]

Release[edit]

The Lost Future premiered on Syfy November 13, 2010[2] and was released on DVD on September 27, 2011 by Entertainment One. It includes a making-of featurette and cast and crew interviews.

There was controversy over the rating of the film; it had been aimed to be shown as a 12A, but due to an explicit sex-scene, the film was rated as a 15.[citation needed]

Reception[edit]

Scott Foy of Dread Central rated the film 2/5 stars and wrote that "this was a classier piece of cinema than the typical schlock Syfy produces", but it is too rushed, has too many characters and dangling storylines, and the action sequences can not make up for the shortcomings.[4] Rod Lott of the Oklahoma Gazette wrote that the film "should be 'Lost' forever" and concluded, "Yeah, I hated it."[5] The Daily Sun wrote that the acting, writing, and special effects were good, but the cast were too clean and pretty to be convincing.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Lewinsky, Scott (2010-05-06). "Six features filmed in South Africa". The Hollywood Reporter. Associated Press. Retrieved 2013-12-30. 
  2. ^ a b Foy, Scott (2010-11-12). "Two Clips of Sean Bean Trying to Survive The Lost Future". Dread Central. Retrieved 2013-12-30. 
  3. ^ "The Lost Future". Radio Times. Retrieved 2013-12-30. 
  4. ^ Foy, Scott (2010-11-18). "Lost Future, The (2010)". Dread Central. Retrieved 2013-12-30. 
  5. ^ Lott, Rod (2011-10-05). "The Lost Future". Oklahoma Gazette. Retrieved 2013-12-30. 
  6. ^ "The Lost Future". The Daily Sun. 2012-08-03. Retrieved 2013-12-30. 

External links[edit]