The Man Nobody Knew

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The Man Nobody Knew
The Man Nobody Knew theatrical poster.jpg
Directed by Carl Colby
Produced by Carl Colby, David Johnson, Grace Guggenheim
Narrated by Carl Colby
Music by Michael Bacon
Cinematography Gary Steele
Edited by Jay Freund
Production
  company
Act 4 Entertainment
Distributed by First Run Features
Release date(s)
  • September 23, 2011 (2011-09-23) (United States)
Running time 104 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Box office $183,342[1]

The Man Nobody Knew: In Search of My Father, CIA Spymaster William Colby is a 2011 American documentary film exploring the life and career of former CIA director William Egan Colby. His son Carl Colby narrated and directed it; David Johnson produced.

Synopsis[edit]

Narrated by Carl Colby, son of the late Director of Central Intelligence William E. Colby, The Man Nobody Knew traces the elder Colby's career in the U.S. intelligence community, along with and in contrast to his home life, including the secrets he kept from his family.[2]

The film begins with Colby's service in World War II as an officer and paratrooper with the OSS, and follows his rise through the Central Intelligence Agency, where his roles included political covert action to oppose the Communist Party in Italy, later counterinsurgency actions and involvement in the 1963 coup in South Vietnam (in concert with President John F. Kennedy) during the Vietnam War, and later as Director of Central Intelligence in the 1970s. During his brief, tumultuous tenure leading the agency, Colby revealed the existence of documents describing illegal activities by the CIA, known as the "Family Jewels", in an effort to reform the agency. The film concludes with Colby's disappearance and death in April 1996.[3][4]

Production[edit]

The Man Nobody Knew was produced by Carl Colby, with David Johnson and Grace Guggenheim, for Act 4 Entertainment.

The film combines archival footage with new interviews, including Zbigniew Brzezinski, Brent Scowcroft,[2] James R. Schlesinger, Donald Rumsfeld, Bob Woodward and Seymour Hersh, among others.[5] William Colby's former wife and Carl Colby's mother, Barbara Colby, is also interviewed regarding Colby's public career and private life.[3]

Release[edit]

U.S. distribution rights were acquired by First Run Features.[5] The film will premiere at Lincoln Plaza Cinemas in New York City on September 23, 2011, followed by a national theatrical release.[2]

Reception[edit]

Reviews for The Man Nobody Knew have been favorable. Time Out New York called it a "tour of queasy, morally questionable intelligence endeavors over the last 50 years from the perspective of the spook community’s grand pooh-bah".[6] A review in The Village Voice stated that the film's "thorough investigation transcends [director Colby's] personal catharsis to become an enduring treatise on how character flaws affect policy".[7] The Man Nobody Knew was designated a "Critics' Pick" by The New York Times' film reviewers.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Man Nobody Knew". BoxOffice. Retrieved 31 December 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c Bryce J. Renninger (17 August 2011). "Carl Colby’s Doc About His CIA Spy Father Gets Picked Up by First Run". indieWIRE. Retrieved 14 September 2011. 
  3. ^ a b Carl Colby (director) (September 2011). The Man Nobody Knew: In Search of My Father, CIA Spymaster William Colby (Motion picture). New York City: Act 4 Entertainment. 
  4. ^ Carl Colby (19 September 2011). "The Man Nobody Knew: In Search of My Father, CIA Spymaster William Colby". The Huffington Post. Retrieved 21 September 2011. 
  5. ^ a b Gordon Cox (18 August 2011). "First Run takes Colby's CIA story". Daily Variety. Retrieved 14 September 2011. 
  6. ^ David Fear (20 September 2011). "Review: The Man Nobody Knew". Time Out New York. Retrieved 21 September 2011. 
  7. ^ Aaron Hills (20 September 2011). "When Dad's Working for the CIA: A Son's Portrait in The Man Nobody Knew". The Village Voice. Retrieved 21 September 2011. 
  8. ^ Webster, Andy (22 September 2011). "Son Takes His Famous Father Out of the Shadows". The New York Times. Retrieved 23 September 2011. 

External links[edit]