The Man Who Could Cheat Death

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The Man Who Could Cheat Death
ManWhoCouldCheatDeathPoster.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Terence Fisher
Produced by Michael Carreras
Anthony Nelson-Keys
Screenplay by Jimmy Sangster
Based on The Man in Half Moon Street by Barré Lyndon
Starring Anton Diffring
Hazel Court
Christopher Lee
Music by Richard Bennett
Cinematography Jack Asher
Edited by John Dunsford
Production
  company
Hammer Film Productions
Distributed by Paramount Pictures (US)
Release date(s) 30 November 1959 (UK)
Running time 83 min.
Country England
Language English
Budget GBP £84,000

The Man Who Could Cheat Death is a 1959 British horror film, directed by Terence Fisher and starring Anton Diffring and Christopher Lee. It was based on the play The Man in Half Moon Street by Barré Lyndon which had been previously filmed in 1945, with the screenplay written by Jimmy Sangster, and was produced by Michael Carreras and Anthony Nelson Keys for Hammer Film Productions. It was released on 30 November 1959.

Plot[edit]

In Paris during 1890, 104-year-old Georges Bonnet (Diffring) is a sculptor who maintains a youthful appearance by regularly murdering women and using their parathyroid glands as an elixir to ward off the signs of age. When Bonnet requires a vital surgery to be undertaken he asks his old colleague Prof. Ludwig Weiss (Arnold Marlé) to perform it. He declines and Bonnet then blackmails Pierre Gerard (Lee) into performing the operation by endangering the life of Janine Dubois (Hazel Court), a young lady both Bonnet and Gerard are romantically interested in.

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

The film was made on a budget of £84,000.[1] The lead role was originally offered to Peter Cushing, who turned it down only a few days before shooting started on 17 November 1958. The European release of the film featured a scene in which Hazel Court appeared topless.[1]

Critical reception[edit]

The Hammer Story: The Authorised History of Hammer Films called the film an "odd mish-mash of mad scientist sci-fi flick and gothic flannel" that "suffers from an excess of dialogue and a lack of action."[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Hallenbeck 2011, p. 104.
  2. ^ Hearn & Barnes 2007, p. 41.
Sources
  • Hallenbeck, Bruce G. (2011). British Cult Cinema: Hammer Fantasy and Sci-Fi. Hemlock Books. 
  • Hearn, Marcus; Barnes, Alan (September 2007). "The Man Who Could Cheat Death". The Hammer Story: The Authorised History of Hammer Films (limited ed.). Titan Books. ISBN 1 84576 185 5. 

External links[edit]