The Missing Links

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The Missing Links
Origin Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Genres R&B, garage rock
Years active 1964–1966
Past members see members list below

The Missing Links were an Australian R&B group from Sydney which existed from 1964 to 1966. The group wore their hair long and smashed their equipment on-stage. There were two main versions of the band: the first had Peter Anson on guitar, Dave Boyne on guitar, Bob Brady on vocals, Danny Cox on drums and Ronnie Peel on bass guitar and released their debut single, "We 2 Should Live" in March 1965. The second version had Andy Anderson on vocals (and initially on drums), Chris Gray on keyboards and harmonica, Doug Ford on vocals and guitar, Baden Hutchens on drums and Ian Thomas on bass guitar, and released their debut album, The Missing Links in December. According to Allmusic's, Richie Unterberger, "This aggregation cut the rawest Australian garage/punk of the era, and indeed some of the best from anywhere, sounding at their best like a fusion of the Troggs and the early Who, letting loose at times with wild feedback that was quite ahead of its time".

History[edit]

The Missing Links were an Australian R&B group formed in early 1964 in Sydney with the line-up of Peter Anson on guitar, Dave Boyne on guitar, Bob Brady on vocals, Danny Cox on drums and Ronnie Peel on bass guitar (ex-Mystics).[1] With their long hair, according to one venue owner, "they looked like a cross between man and ape" and so were named, The Missing Links (see transitional fossil).[2] In November, the group played a benefit concert to support Oz founders, Richard Neville, Richard Walsh and Martin Sharp. The trio had been charged with obscenity and were awaiting trial.[3]

The first version of the band recorded a single, "We 2 Should Live" which was released in March 1965 on the Parlophone label.[3] By that time, Boyne was replaced on guitar by John Jones (Mystics) and Cox left soon after with New Zealand-born Andy Anderson (as Andy James aka Neville Anderson) joining, initially on drums. The band briefly broke up in July.[1] Anson formed a band, The Syndicate; Brady joined Python Lee Jackson; and Peel joined Brisbane-based group, The Pleazers.[3]

The Missing Links reformed before the end of July with Anderson and Jones joined temporarily by Dave Longmore on vocals and guitar, Frank Kennington on vocals and Col Risby on guitar.[3] Longmore was soon replaced by Doug Ford with Chris Gray joining on keyboards and harmonica.[3] Baden Hutchens on drums and Ian Thomas on bass guitar (both ex-Showmen) completed the line-up of the second version, which was "even more fierce version than the first".[1] During live performances, Anderson would climb walls to hang from rafters, then drive his head into the drums, other band members smashed guitars into speakers and all wore the latest Carnaby Street clothes.[2][3]

The group signed with Philips Records and released "You're Drivin' Me Insane" in August 1965 followed in September by "Wild About You".[2] Veteran rock 'n' roller, Johnny O'Keefe was not a fan – he banned them from appearing on his television show, Sing Sing Sing.[3] They issued another single, "H'tuom Tuhs", in October which was followed by their debut album, The Missing Links, in December.[2] According to Allmusic's, Richie Unterberger, "This aggregation cut the rawest Australian garage/punk of the era, and indeed some of the best from anywhere, sounding at their best like a fusion of the Troggs and the early Who, letting loose at times with wild feedback that was quite ahead of its time".[4]

Hutchens and Thomas returned to Showmen, while the remaining members – Anderson, Gray, Ford and Jones – continued with an extended play, The Links Unchained in April 1966.[3] The group disbanded in August.[1]

Their self-titled 1965 LP was re-issued by Raven Records on vinyl in 1986 and (with a number of bonus tracks) by the Half A Cow label on CD in 2001. The original LP has sold to collectors for as much as A$2000 in August 2004.[3]

Legacy[edit]

After The Missing Links had disbanded, Anderson and Ford formed Running Jumping Standing Still in Melbourne in August 1966.[1] Anderson later became an actor on Australian and New Zealand television. Ford was lead guitarist in The Masters Apprentices from 1968.[3]

The Missing Links have influenced many later Australian groups, including The Saints which covered "Wild About You" on their debut album, (I'm) Stranded (1977).[5] In October 2010, The Missing Links' debut album, The Missing Links was listed in the top 50 in the book, 100 Best Australian Albums.[6]

Members[edit]

  • Peter Anson – guitar, vocals
  • Dave Boyne – guitar
  • Bob Brady – vocals, percussion
  • Danny Cox – drums
  • Ronnie Peel – bass guitar, harmonica
  • John Jones – guitar
  • Andy Anderson (as Andy James aka Neville Anderson) – vocals, drums
  • Dave Longmore – vocals, guitar
  • Frank Kennington – vocals
  • Col Risby – guitar
  • Doug Ford – vocals, guitar
  • Chris Gray – keyboards, harmonica
  • Baden Hutchens – drums, vocals
  • Ian Thomas – bass, vocals

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ a b c d e McFarlane, 'The Missing Links' entry. Retrieved 7 April 2011.
  2. ^ a b c d Nimmervoll, Ed. "Missing Links". Howlspace – The Living History of Our Music (Ed Nimmervoll). White Room Electronic Publishing Pty Ltd. Archived from the original on 27 July 2012. Retrieved 24 January 2014. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Kimball, Duncan (2002). "The Missing Links". Milesago: Australasian Music and Popular Culture 1964–1975. Ice Productions. Retrieved 7 April 2011. 
  4. ^ Unterberger, Richie. "The Missing Links". Allmusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 7 April 2011. 
  5. ^ Cockington, James (2001). "Sunshine Sounds". Long Way to the Top: Stories of Australian Rock & Roll. Sydney, NSW: Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC). pp. 210–211. ISBN 978-0-7333-0750-8. 
  6. ^ O'Donnell, John; Creswell, Toby; Mathieson, Craig (October 2010). 100 Best Australian Albums. Prahran, Vic: Hardie Grant Books. ISBN 978-1-74066-955-9. 
  7. ^ "Who's who of Australian rock / compiled by Chris Spencer, Zbig Nowara & Paul McHenry". catalogue. National Library of Australia. Retrieved 8 November 2010.  Note: [on-line] version established at White Room Electronic Publishing Pty Ltd in 2007 and was expanded from the 2002 edition. As from September 2010, [on-line] version appears to have an Internal Service Error.