The Mourning Bride (Tragedy)

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Frontispiece of The Mourning Bride published in 1703

The Mourning Bride is a tragedy written by British playwright William Congreve. It premiered in 1697 at Betterton's Co., Lincoln's Inn Fields. The play centers on Zara, a queen held captive by Manuel, King of Granada, and a web of love and deception which results in the mistaken murder of Manuel who is in disguise, and Zara's also mistaken suicide in response.

Quotations[edit]

There are two very widely known quotations in the play; from the opening to the play:

Music has charms to soothe a savage breast,[1]

The word "breast" is often misquoted as "beast" and "has" sometimes appears as "hath".

Also often repeated is a quotation of Zara in Act III, Scene VIII:

Heaven has no rage, like love to hatred turned,
Nor hell a fury, like a woman scorned.[1]

This is usually paraphrased as "Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned."

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b From text at [1]. See also Quotes from The Mourning Bride.

References[edit]

  • Erskine-Hill, H., Lindsay, A. (eds), William Congreve: The Critical Heritage, Routledge (1995).
  • Congreve, W., The Works of Mr. Congreve: Volume 2. Containing: The Mourning Bride; The Way of the World; The Judgment of Paris; Semele; and Poems on Several Occasions, Adamant Media (2001), facsimile reprint of a 1788 edition published in London.
  • Mackenzie, D., The Works of William Congreve: Volume I, OUP Oxford (2011), v. 1, pp.5-94.


External links[edit]