The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University

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The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University (CASAColumbia) is a science-based, multidisciplinary organization focused on transforming society's understanding of and response to the disease of addiction. It was founded in 1992, by Former U.S. Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare Joseph A. Califano, Jr.,[1] CASAColumbia assembles the professional skills needed to research, prevent, treat and eliminate this disease in all sectors of society. CASAColumbia also conducts research and utilizes the scientific findings of others to inform Americans of the economic and social costs of substance use and addiction and their impact on each of our lives. By doing so, CASAColumbia aims to reduce the stigma attached to this disease by replacing shame with hope and give people the tools they need to prevent, treat and eliminate addiction.[2]

The group has been criticized [3] for releasing its reports without peer-review.

In November 2011, the Columbia Spectator editorial board published an piece titled "Cut ties to CASA", stating that "the methods that CASA uses to research substance abuse are shoddy and questionable, and reports of CASA’s “findings” are often misleading and sensationalized" and that "Califano’s outlandish claims reflect on the integrity of the organization, and unfortunately on Columbia’s as well."[4]

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