The New American

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The New American
New-American-Review-Logo.png
Editor Gary Benoit
Categories Editorial magazine
Frequency Twice a month
Total circulation
(October 2014)
17,054[1]
First issue September 30, 1985
Company American Opinion Publishing Inc.
Country United States
Based in Appleton, Wisconsin
Language English
Website www.thenewamerican.com
ISSN 0885-6540

The New American (TNA) is a print magazine published twice a month by American Opinion Publishing Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of The John Birch Society (JBS). The magazine was created in 1985 from the merger of two JBS magazines: American Opinion and The Review of the News. It describes itself as “the essential news source for freedom-loving Americans.” [2]

The print version of the magazine is available to subscribers, but publishes free daily content online.

History[edit]

In February 1965, Robert W. Welch, Jr. created his first publication called One Man’s Opinion, which later became known two years later as American Opinion. This journal, published monthly, was meant for serious students of political affairs.

Additionally, starting in 1965 was another JBS affiliated publication known as The Review of the News, which was intended for a broader readership. This magazine was meant for straight news. The first published version of “Correction, Please!” was featured in this magazine and is also now continued in The New American. [3]

In September 1985, American Opinion was merged with The Review of the News to create The New American. This merge was intended to combine the best of the two publications to acquire a readership large enough to “make the saving of our country possible.”[4] The magazine’s name was inspired by an essay written by Robert Welch titled “New Americanism”.

Seeking to not be a news magazine in the same sense as Time magazine or Newsweek, The New American is meant to have information that can be seen as a hybrid due to its in-depth articles and publication time. As a magazine published twice a month, The New American requires more time to prepare and to allow their readers to absorb.

According to Gary Benoit, “The New American, therefore, is meant to offer balance and variety –the proper mix between the in-depth and the briefly stated, the unpleasant and the uplifting, the historical and the contemporary, the political and the cultural, the straightforward and the reflective, the serious and the humorous. We do not mean a mix between the true and the false, the moral and the immoral, the right and the wrong. We promise always to publish the truth and to let the chips fall where they may; we promise never to conceal an unpleasant truth simply because it may run contrary to the popular opinion.”

The Freedom Index[edit]

Published in The New American twice per year or four times each (two-year) congressional term, The Freedom Index is a Congressional scorecard based on the U.S. Constitution. "It rates congressmen based on their adherence to constitutional principles of limited government, fiscal responsibility, national sovereignty, and a traditional foreign policy of avoiding foreign entanglements."[5]

Philosophy[edit]

The New American has been described as having a point of view guided by the U.S. Constitution. The mission of this magazine is as the slogan provides on each cover, “That freedom shall not perish.” [6]

Staff[edit]

Editors[edit]

  • Jeffrey St. John 1985-1986
  • Gary Benoit 1986-1989, 1991-present
  • F.R. Duplantier 1989-1991

Notable contributors (current, past, or both)[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The New American". Wisconsin: American Opinion Publishing Inc. October 1, 2014. 
  2. ^ "The New American". Wisconsin: American Opinion Publishing Inc. 
  3. ^ The Review of the News September 9, 1965 Correction, Please!
  4. ^ The New American January 5, 1987 Letter from the Editor
  5. ^ The Freedom Index, Wisconsin: American Opinion Publishing Inc. 
  6. ^ "The New American 20 years of TRUTH!". Wisconsin: American Opinion Publishing Inc. September 19, 2005. 

External links[edit]