The New Inn, Gloucester

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The New Inn looking from the courtyard out.
Looking towards the far end of the courtyard.

The New Inn, 16 Northgate Street, Gloucester, GL1 1SF, is a public house, hotel and restaurant that is Grade I listed by English Heritage and is the most complete surviving example of a medieval courtyard inn with galleries in Britain.[1] The announcement of Lady Jane Grey's succession to the British throne was made from the Inn gallery in 1553.[2][3]

History[edit]

The Inn was built not long before 1455[4] by John Twyning, a monk, as a hostelry for the former Benedictine Abbey of St Peter. It is on the site of an earlier inn. After the dissolution of St Peter's the inn passed to the Dean and Chapter of Gloucester Cathedral and was leased to various inn holders until it was sold in 1858. Stories that the inn was built to provide lodgings for pilgrims to the tomb of King Edward II were first recorded in the eighteenth century and may be incorrect.[1]

In 1553, King Edward VI died and Lady Jane Grey was staying at The New Inn when the proclamation of her succession to the British throne was made[5] from the Inn gallery.[3]

Claims that William Shakespeare may have performed at the Inn with his company The Lord Chamberlain's Men, remain unproven, though it is known that the company did visit and perform in the city.[3]

Architecture[edit]

The Inn is entered through a carriage way from Northgate Street, and is the most complete surviving example of a medieval courtyard inn with galleries in Britain.[1]

Close to the entrance to the Inn in Northgate Street lies New Inn Lane, which runs parallel to Eastgate Street and The Oxbode. Reportedly, it was originally called Pilgrims Lane.[6]

Today[edit]

Today the Inn is a restaurant, pub and hotel. It also serves as a meeting place for CAMRA and a local branch of the Rotary Club.

The Inn is supposedly haunted with one unexplained event captured on CCTV in 2010.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c New Inn. English Heritage. Retrieved 26 June 2011.
  2. ^ Later Tudors 1547 - 1603. infobritain.co.uk. Retrieved 27 June 2011.
  3. ^ a b c Did Shakespeare perform in city pub? This is Gloucestershire, 23 June 2009. Retrieved 27 June 2011.
  4. ^ Jurica, John. Gloucester A Pictorial History. Chichester: Phillimore, 1994, caption 99. ISBN 0-85033-836-0
  5. ^ Later Tudors 1547 - 1603. infobritain.co.uk. Retrieved 27 June 2011.
  6. ^ "Medieval Gloucester: The later middle ages, A History of the County of Gloucester: Volume 4: The City of Gloucester" by N.M. Herbert (ed) in British History Online, http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=42273. Retrieved 27 June 2011.
  7. ^ 'Ghost' at Gloucester pub 'pushes pint off table'. BBC Gloucestershire, 27 May 2010. Retrieved 26 June 2011.

Further reading[edit]

  • "Medieval Inns" by E.M. Jope in Studies in Building History, 1961, pp. 166-191.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 51°51′55″N 2°14′42″W / 51.8654°N 2.2450°W / 51.8654; -2.2450