The New Press

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The New Press is an independent[1] non-profit public-interest book publisher established in 1992 by André Schiffrin[2][3] (Chevalier of the Légion d'honneur) and Diane Wachtell.[4][5]

Details[edit]

In 1990 André Schiffrin resigned as editor-in-chief of Pantheon Books and within two years raised enough money to launch the New Press,[3] with former Pantheon editor Diane Wachtell.[4] Many of Schiffrin's authors from Pantheon, including Studs Terkel, left to join him.[3][6]

The New Press is a nonprofit organization intended to publish books in the public interest, that "promote and enrich public discussion and understanding of the issues vital to our democracy and to a more equitable world."[1] Schiffrin likened it to "public television and radio, a house to supplement university presses in publishing riskier books."[4] The business model was noteworthy for its innovation, it included grant support in addition to publishing revenue; academic partnerships and staff diversity.[2] Its intern programme aimed at attracting candidates from minority ethnic backgrounds into the book business benefited the wider world of publishing.[3] Victor Navasky, writing in The Nation, called it "a bold experiment in nonprofit, relatively radical book publishing".[6]

Schiffrin was editor in chief for more than a decade, and remained 'founding director and editor at large' until his death in 2013.[4][2][5] In 2014 the board of directors includes Barbara Ehrenreich, Gara LaMarche, Michael Ratner and Bob Herbert.

Notable New Press authors include Alice Walker and Bill Moyers.[5] John W. Dower’s Embracing Defeat: Japan in the Wake of World War II was published by New Press and won the Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction in 2000.[5] Best selling New Press books include The Good War by Studs Terkel; The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander;[7] and Understanding Power by Noam Chomsky.

In 2013 New Press was reported as publishing about fifty books a year, virtually all of them of social consequence.[6]

Awards[edit]

New Press books that have won awards:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Ulin, David (2 December 2013). "Andre Schiffrin dies at 78; book publisher founded New Press". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 1 August 2014. 
  2. ^ a b c "New Press Founder André Schiffrin Dead at 78", Publishers Weekly. Accessed 1 August 2014.
  3. ^ a b c d Rubinstein, Felicity (2 December 2013). "André Schiffrin obituary". The Guardian. Retrieved 1 August 2014. 
  4. ^ a b c d Robert D. McFadden "André Schiffrin, Publishing Force and a Founder of New Press, Is Dead at 78", New York Times, December 1, 2013
  5. ^ a b c d e Schudel, Matt (3 December 2013). "André Schiffrin, key figure in N.Y. publishing, dies at 78". Washington Post. Retrieved 1 August 2014. 
  6. ^ a b c "Remembering André Schiffrin ", The Nation. Accessed 1 August 2014.
  7. ^ Sandhu, Sukhdev (17 February 2012). "Radical alternatives to conventional publishing". The Guardian. Retrieved 1 August 2014. 
  8. ^ "Infinity Awards 1985-1995", International Center of Photography. 1 August 2014.

External links[edit]