The New York Times Manual of Style and Usage

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The New York Times Manual of Style and Usage: The Official Style Guide Used by the Writers and Editors of the World's Most Authoritative Newspaper is a style guide created in 1950 by editors at the newspaper and revised in 1974, 1999, and 2002 by Allan M. Siegal and William G. Connolly. A revised and expanded paperback edition was published in 2002.[1] According to the Times Deputy News Editor, Philip B. Corbett (who is in charge of revising the manual), there is a more current, online version of the manual that is used by Times staff, but this online manual is not available to the general public.[2]

Some differences between the Associated Press's style manual and that of The New York Times are:

  • The Times's uses double S's for possessives. This is a deviation from AP style.
  • The Times's manual gives rationale for many practices for which The AP Stylebook does not.
  • The Times's guide is self-indexed, while the Associated Press's book has separate sections for sports and weather entries, and it combines many entries under such terms as "weapons" and "weather."
  • The Times's book has some whimsical entries, such as one for how to spell shh.
  • The Times's book requires that the surnames of subjects (sports-related columns being the most notable exceptions) be prefixed with a title (such as Dr., Mr., Ms., or Mrs.).
  • The Times's permits the use of "over" in relation to numbers and amounts; the AP prefers the distinction of "more than."

The style guides of Dow Jones & Company and The Wall Street Journal are similar to The Times's counterpart (WSJ also adheres to the AP style manual), but they have those differences given above.

References[edit]

  1. ^ The New York Times Manual of Style and Usage : The Official Style Guide Used by the Writers and Editors of the World's Most Authoritative Newspaper. Three Rivers Press. 2002. ISBN 978-0812963892. 
  2. ^ Talk to the Newsroom: Deputy News Editor Philip B. Corbett, retrieved 3 February 2010