The Newspaper Guild

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TNG-CWA
TNG-CWA logo.png
Full name The Newspaper Guild
Founded 1933
Members 32,000
Head union Communications Workers of America
Affiliation IFJ
Key people Bernie Lunzer, president
Office location Washington, D.C.
Country United States, Canada
Website www.newsguild.org

The Newspaper Guild-CWA is a labor union founded by newspaper journalists in 1933 who noticed that unionized printers and truck drivers were making more money than they did. In addition to improving wages and working conditions, its constitution says its purpose is to fight for honesty in journalism and the news industry's business practices.

The organization's founders were Joseph Cookman an editor of the New York Post, Allen Raymond of the New York Herald Tribune and Heywood Broun of the New York World-Telegram.[1] Carl Randau was its director from 1934 to 1940.[2][3] It was originally called the American Newspaper Guild, but it changed its name in the 1970s to reflect the fact that it also operated outside the United States. It had expanded into Canada in the 1950s.

It became affiliated with the American Federation of Labor in 1936, then left to go into the new Congress of Industrial Organizations in 1937, when it expanded its membership to non-editorial departments. It merged with the Communications Workers of America in 1995. The Guild is also affiliated with the International Federation of Journalists.

Today, the Guild has more than 32,000 members in the United States, Canada and Puerto Rico. Its membership has expanded from just journalists to many other employees of newspapers and news agencies, such as clerks who take classified ads and computer support workers. It also represents workers in a number of other industries.

Its President is Bernie Lunzer and its Secretary-Treasurer is Carol Rothman.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ New York Times November 16, 1933
  2. ^ Abe C. Ravitz, Leane Zugsmith: Thunder on the Left, Intl Pub, 1992, p. 102 [1]
  3. ^ Benjamin Stolberg, The story of the CIO, Arno, 1971, p. 251

External links[edit]