The Norman Anonymous

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The Norman Anonymous (sometimes Anonymous of Rouen or Anonymous of York) is the name given to the author of a collection of treatises, the Tractatus Eboracenses, dealing with the relationship between kings and the Catholic Church, written c. 1100.[1] The author, whose identity remains a mystery, offered some of the most strongly worded defences of royal authority and even superiority to the Catholic Church ever uttered in the medieval West. Surviving in just a single manuscript, the text is the only contribution made by the Anglo-Norman realm to the Investiture Controversy.[citation needed]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ G. Williams, The Norman Anonymous of 1100 AD: Towards the Identification and Evaluation of the socalled Anonymous of York, Harvard Theological Studies, xvii (1951).

Further reading[edit]

  • The Norman Anonymous is available in a facsimile edition, Der Codex 415 des Corpus Christi College Cambridge : Facs.-Ausg. d. Textüberlieferung d. Normannischen Anonymus ed. Karl Pellens (1977)
  • Sections are available in English translation in English Historical Documents II, ed. Douglas, pp. 675-8.
  • G.Williams, The Norman Anonymous of 1100 AD: Towards the Identification and Evaluation of the socalled Anonymous of York, Harvard Theological Studies, xvii (1951)
  • K.Pellens, 'The tracts of the Norman Anonymous: Corpus Christi College Cambridge Ms. 415',. Transactions of the Cambridge Bibliographical Society (1965)

External links[edit]