The Odd Man

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The Odd Man
Created by Edward Boyd
Starring Moultrie Kelsall
William Mervyn
Keith Barron
Geoffrey Toone
Edwin Richfield
Sarah Lawson
Country of origin United Kingdom
No. of episodes 32
Production
Running time 50 minutes
Broadcast
Original channel Granada TV
Original run 19 October 1960 (1960-10-19) – 13 September 1963 (1963-09-13)
It's Dark Outside
Created by Marc Brandel
Starring William Mervyn
Keith Barron
Anthony Ainley
John Carson
June Tobin
Veronica Strong
Country of origin United Kingdom
No. of episodes 16
Production
Running time 50 minutes
Broadcast
Original channel Granada TV
Original run 3 January 1964 (1964-01-03) – 23 April 1965 (1965-04-23)
Mr Rose
Created by Philip Mackie
Starring William Mervyn
Donald Webster
Gillian Lewis
Country of origin United Kingdom
No. of episodes 24
Production
Running time 50 minutes
Broadcast
Original channel Granada TV
Original run 17 February 1967 (1967-02-17) – 5 July 1968 (1968-07-05)

The Odd Man was the first of a trilogy of police series produced in the 1960s by Granada TV, linked by the presence of pompous but increasingly genial police Chief Inspector Charles Rose (William Mervyn). It originally dealt with the investigations of theatrical-agent-cum-detective Steve Gardiner (Geoffrey Toone in the first season, Edwin Richfield thereafter), who was the "odd man" of the series' title, and his encounters with the police in the form of Chief Inspector Gordon (Moultrie Kelsall), who was replaced by Rose from series three onwards, and DS Macbride (Alan Tilvern) who lasted for a single season before being replaced by DS Swift (Keith Barron).

The characters of Rose and Swift were then given their own series, It's Dark Outside, which ran for two seasons, with Barron being replaced in the second series by Anthony Ainley as DS Hunter.

The third and final series in the trilogy, Mr Rose, saw Rose in retirement in Eastbourne, attempting to write his memoirs, but instead being drawn into private detection. The theme tune for this series was by John Snow, and issued on a single as a cover version by Roy Budd on the Pye Records label in 1967. A separate cover version was recorded on the album "Time For TV" by Brian Fahey and his Orchestra, on the Studio 2 Stereo label. John Snow's original recording was recorded by the De Wolfe mood music library, and is not commercially available.