The Oxford Student

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The Oxford Student
The Oxford Student.gif
Type Weekly newspaper during Oxford University term time
Format Compact
Owner(s) Oxford Student Services Ltd
Founded 1992
Political alignment none
Circulation c. 15,000[1]
Official website www.oxfordstudent.com

The Oxford Student is a newspaper produced by and for students of the University of Oxford; it is sometimes abbreviated to The OxStu. The paper was established in 1992 by the Oxford University Student Union.[2]

The Oxford Student is owned by OUSU and run through the Student Union's commercial subsidiary, Oxford Student Services Ltd (OSSL). The newspaper's constitution grants the paper editorial independence.

Accolades[edit]

The Oxford Student was named "Student Newspaper of the Year" at the Guardian Student Media Awards in 2001, was shortlisted in 2004 and 2012, and awarded the runner-up prize in 2007.[3]

Exposition Magazine[edit]

Every term, the Oxford Student's sister magazine, Exposition, is released along with the penultimate issue of the paper. Exposition is primarily written by university post-graduates "covering politics, society and the arts and encompassing a diverse array of disciplines: from Art History to International Relations, Urban Anthropology to Legal Ethics." [4]

Controversy[edit]

In 2004, the newspaper gained national publicity when two reporters broke University rules to expose security flaws in the University's computer network; the student journalists responsible, Patrick Foster and Roger Waite, were rusticated by the University's Court of Summary Jurisdiction, but on appeal their punishment was reduced to a fine.[5] Foster now works as Media Correspondent for The Times, and Waite worked for the Sunday Times for a few years after graduating.

In 2014, shortly after Amelia Hamer became editor, the paper ran a news story[6] about the Ben Sullivan controversy[7]which caused an outcry amongst students as it reinforced rape myths in the press, potentially making the women involved identifiable and unfairly targeting them. It garnered negative attention in other student media,[8] and also led to calls for Hamer to resign. Amelia Hamer was removed from her role because of the above concerns on the 24th September of that year.[9]

Contributors[edit]

Former contributors include Laura Barton of The Guardian, Mark Henderson and Rob Hands of The Times, and Karl Smith of The Independent.[citation needed]

The editors for Michaelmas Term 2014 are Amelia Hamer and Jessica Sinyor.[10]

Former Editors:

  • Nick Toner and Rosalind Brody - Trinity 2014
  • Ruth Maclean and Miles Dilworth - Hilary 2014
  • Tom Ough and Sarah Poulten - Michaelmas 2013
  • Alis Lewis and Charles Walmsley - Trinity 2013
  • James Restall and Jonathan Tomlin - Hilary 2013

References[edit]

External links[edit]