The Oxymoron

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The Oxymoron
Type Termly satirical
news magazine
Format Magazine
Owner(s) student-run
Founded 2007
Circulation 2,500
Official website

OXymorON Website

[1]

The Oxymoron is a student satirical magazine published anonymously by and for students of Oxford University. It takes the form of a spoof newspaper, similar to The Onion, though with a focus on events relevant to the life of an Oxford student. The magazine takes its name from the concept of an oxymoron, as well as being a reference to the word Oxon, used to identify an Oxford degree. It is published termly.

History[edit]

The magazine was founded in Michaelmas term of 2007 and first published on November 17. Each issue from the second has been 8 pages in length; the first contained 4 pages. These are split between news satire, and spoof features. In contrast with the majority of student publications, it is printed without the names of the writers or editors, and these are not normally made public. Many previous Oxymoron editors have gone on to work as professional journalists and comedy writers. [2]

The Oxymoron has the largest Facebook group of any Oxford magazine or newspaper.[citation needed] Despite this popularity, the magazine has at times struggled to find funding - it carries few advertisements and seeks alternative funding through a combination of JCR subscriptions and charity comedy nights by acts such as the Oxford Revue.[citation needed]

Awards[edit]

Year Awards Nomination Result Winner
2008 Guardian Student Media Awards Best Magazine Nominated Quench, University of Cardiff[3]
2009 Guardian Student Media Awards Best Magazine Winner Won[4]
2010 Guardian Student Media Awards Digital Journalist of the Year (Mimi Kempton Stewart) Runner-up Will Benton, [Kings College, London] [5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "OXymorON". Theoxymoron.co.uk. Retrieved 2008-11-02. 
  2. ^ "OXymorON". Theoxymoron.co.uk. Retrieved 2008-11-02. 
  3. ^ "On course to win | Media | The Guardian". London: The Guardian. 2008-09-29. Retrieved 2008-11-02. 
  4. ^ "Guardian Student Media Awards, 2009: Winners". London: The Guardian. 2009-11-26. Retrieved 27 February 2010. 
  5. ^ "Winners and Runners-Up, 2010". London: The Guardian. 2010-11-25. Retrieved 11 March 2011.