The Paragon, Bath

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The Paragon
The Paragon Bath.jpg
Location Bath, Somerset, England
Coordinates 51°23′12″N 2°21′36″W / 51.38667°N 2.36000°W / 51.38667; -2.36000Coordinates: 51°23′12″N 2°21′36″W / 51.38667°N 2.36000°W / 51.38667; -2.36000
Built 1768
Architect Thomas Warr Attwood
Architectural style(s) Georgian
Listed Building – Grade I
Official name: Numbers 1 to 21
Designated 12 June 1950[1]
Reference no. 443210
Listed Building – Grade II
Official name: Numbers 22 to 37
Designated 12 June 1950[2]
Reference no. 443211
Listed Building – Grade II
Official name: Walcot Church House
Designated 11 August 1972[3]
Reference no. 443213
Listed Building – Grade II
Official name: Walcot Cemetery Gates
Designated 12June, 1950[4]
Reference no. 443212
The Paragon, Bath is located in Somerset
The Paragon, Bath
Location of The Paragon in Somerset

The Paragon in the Walcot area of Bath, Somerset, England is a street of Georgian houses which have been designated as listed buildings. It was designed by Thomas Warr Attwood.[5] It now forms part of the A4.

Numbers 1 to 21 are 3 storey houses with mansard roofs. Each building has matching doors and widows with central pediments and flat entablatures either side of the 1st floor windows and Tuscan pilasters and pediments to the doorways.[1]

Numbers 22 to 37 continue the theme from numbers 1 to 21 and were completed in 1775 by Joseph Axford, a local mason. Numbers 28 to 32 were damaged by bombing during World War II but have since been restored.[2]

History[edit]

The Paragon

St Swithin's Church was built between 1779 and 1790 by John Palmer.[6] On 30 May 1797 the abolitionist William Wilberforce and Barbara Spooner Wilberforce were married in the church. It 1805 it was the burial place of the writer and poet Christopher Anstey and, in 1831 of Rear Admiral Sir Edward Berry. The church house which forms number 38 The Paragon was built in the early 18th century.[3] The adjoining cemetery has gates with a rusticated base and panels with inverted torches between pilasters. There is an entablature with metopes and triglyphs.[4]

The Building of Bath Collection lies just off the Paragon in a courtyard, known as "The Vineyards", in a building which was built in 1765 as the Trinity Presbyterian Church. It was also known as the Countess of Huntingdon's Chapel, as she lived in the attached house from 1707–1791.

During the Bath Blitz of 25/26 April 1942, one of the retailitory raids on England by the Baedeker Blitz following the RAF's raid on Lübeck, a bomb fell into The Paragon, demolishing several of the houses. These have since been reconstructed in the original style.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Numbers 1 to 21". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 2009-08-09. 
  2. ^ a b "Numbers 22 to 37". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 2009-08-09. 
  3. ^ a b "Walcot Church House". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 2009-08-09. 
  4. ^ a b "Walcot Cemetery Gates". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 2009-08-09. 
  5. ^ Lewis Baker, David. "The Paragon Bath #1". Yessy art gallery. Retrieved 2009-08-09. 
  6. ^ "Church of St Swithin, Walcot". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 2009-08-09.