The Perils of Pauline (1947 film)

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The Perils of Pauline
The Perils of Pauline - 1947 Poster.jpg
1947 theatrical poster
Directed by George Marshall
Produced by Sol C. Siegel (producer)
Written by P.J. Wolfson (story & screenplay) and
Frank Butler (screenplay)
Starring Betty Hutton
John Lund
Music by Robert Emmett Dolan
Cinematography Ray Rennahan
Edited by Arthur P. Schmidt
Production
company
Distributed by Paramount Pictures
Release dates
  • July 4, 1947 (1947-07-04)
Running time 96 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Home video VHS cover

The Perils of Pauline is a 1947 American film directed by George Marshall and released by Paramount Pictures. The film is a fictionalized Hollywood account of silent film star Pearl White's rise to fame, starring Betty Hutton as White.

The film, a broad satire of silent-film production, is a musical-comedy vehicle for Hutton, filmed in Technicolor, with original songs by Frank Loesser (including the standards "I Wish I Didn't Love You So" and "Rumble, Rumble, Rumble").

Paul Panzer, who played the villain in the 1914 film, has a very small part in this film, as do silent-comedy veterans Chester Conklin, Hank Mann, Snub Pollard, and James Finlayson.

The film is in the public domain today. However, Universal Studios (through NBC Universal Television, successor-in-interest to EMKA, Ltd.) owns the original film elements. All public domain video releases are sourced from 16 mm television prints that have faded over the years.

Plot[edit]

"Pearl" is an ambitious hoyden who rises from amateur-night vaudeville to silent-screen stardom. The major plot line is the romantic relationship she has with Farrington, the hard driving boss (Lund) of the vaudevile troop she joins, the film career is a secondary plot line.

The film is highly anachronistic with Hutton generally performing in swing style though the action takes places in the teens and early twenties. However the free-wheeling, less complicated and often impetuous nature of early silent film making is captured in spirit.

Cast[edit]

Soundtrack[edit]

Awards[edit]

Frank Loesser was nominated for an Oscar in the category "Best Music, Original Song" for "I Wish I Didn't Love You So".[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The 20th Academy Awards (1948) Nominees and Winners". oscars.org. Archived from the original on 6 July 2011. Retrieved 2011-08-18. 

External links[edit]