The Popular Magazine

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
The Popular Magazine
Popular Magazine April 7 1915.jpg
April 7, 1915 issue
Editor Henry Harrison Lewis (1903-1904); Charles Agnew MacLean (1904-1928)
Categories Literary magazines
Frequency Variable; most often bi-monthly
Publisher Street & Smith
Year founded 1904
First issue November 1903
Country United States
Language English

The Popular Magazine was an early American literary magazine that ran for 612 issues from November 1903 to October 1931. It featured short fiction, novellas, serialized larger works, and even entire short novels. The magazine's subject matter ranged over a number of genres, although it tended somewhat towards men's adventure stories, particularly in the waning years of the publication when the vogue for hardboiled fiction was strong. The Popular Magazine touted itself as "a magazine for men and women who like to read about men."

History[edit]

The Popular Magazine initially started as a boy's magazine, but the editorial focus was shifted after only three issues to one of adult mainstream fiction, a program the magazine would retain for the rest of its publication run.[1] The magazine can be considered a forerunner of the pulp fiction magazines that were prominent from the 1920s to 1950s, as it avoided more highbrow fare in favor of fiction "for the common man." Several issues of The Popular Magazine featured illustrations by N.C. Wyeth.[2]

One of the magazine's earliest successes came with the publication of H. Rider Haggard's novel Ayesha in 1905. Other notable writers published by The Popular Magazine include Morgan Robertson, H.G. Wells, Rafael Sabatini, Zane Grey, Beatrice Grimshaw, Elmer Brown Mason, James Francis Dwyer and William Wallace Cook.[3] The Popular Magazine published Craig Kennedy stories by Arthur B. Reeve, and other crime fiction by Frederick William Davis[3] and Lemuel De Bra. The magazine also carried many science fiction and fantasy stories by Edwin Balmer, John Buchan, John Collier, Roy Norton, Sax Rohmer and Edgar Wallace.[4]

The magazine went through several slight name changes towards the end of its run. In December 1927 it became Popular Stories, and then a month later, The Popular. In October 1928 the name was changed back to The Popular Magazine once again.

The Popular Magazine was published by Street & Smith and edited by Henry Harrison Lewis from 1903 to 1904, and Charles Agnew MacLean from 1904 to 1928. A typical bi-monthly issue usually ran from 194 to 224 pages.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Popular Magazine: Appreciating the 'Slickest' Pulp" by Ed Hulse, Blood 'N' Thunder magazine. Part I, No. 24 (Summer 2009) (pp. 76-100); Part II, No. 25 (Winter 2010), pp. 78-99.
  2. ^ Pulp Culture - The Art of Fiction Magazines by Frank M. Robinson and Lawrence Davidson. Collectors Press, 2007. ISBN 1-933112-30-1 (p. 17).
  3. ^ a b The Dime Novel Companion: a source book by J. Randolph Cox Greenwood Publishing Group, 2000, ISBN 0313256748 (pp. 72, 186)
  4. ^ The Popular Magazine in The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, edited by John Clute and John Grant. Orbit Books, 1993 (p. 949).

External links[edit]