The Poznań

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Manchester City fans doing The Poznań.

The Poznań Celebration or Grecque is a form of sporting celebration, which is associated with the supporters of Polish football club Lech Poznań and other European teams. The celebration involves supporters standing with their backs to the pitch, linking shoulders side-by-side and jumping on the spot in unison. It is mostly associated with Lech Poznań in Poland, Manchester City supporters in England and Celtic in Scotland (where it is known as 'The Huddle').

Usage[edit]

The Poznań Celebration involves the fans turning their backs to the pitch, joining arms and jumping up and down in unison. It originated in 1961.[1] In Poland, and among many fans across Europe,[2] it is not called "the Poznan" but is known as a "Grecque", and it is performed by fans of many teams.[3]

Despite initially failing to impress Manchester City fans when it was done during the teams' meeting in the UEFA Europa League on 21 October 2010, it was subsequently adopted by City supporters during a game early the following month.[2][4] The activity was coined 'The Poznan' by Manchester City fans, in homage to the club that inspired them to celebrate in this way.

The Poznań has in turn been adopted by other English football supporters, notably those of Leicester City after their clash with Manchester City in the third round of the FA Cup in January 2011, and is referred to by English football fans, and by the British media,[5] as "doing the Poznań".[6]

It has also been used to mock Manchester City fans, such as when newly promoted Cardiff City beat them 3-2 in August 2013. More examples include when Arsenal supporters did the Poznań celebration after Mikel Arteta scored the winning goal for Arsenal in April 2012,[7] Manchester City's local rivals Manchester United supporters did it during a Manchester derby game during the 2011–12 FA Cup [8] as well as Bayern Munich fans during a Champions League group match against them in October 2013.

Initially the supporters group of Australian club Western Sydney Wanderers, The Red and Black Bloc, performed it in the 80th minute of matches to represent the first football match played in western Sydney in 1880. Subsequently this has grown into an all stadium celebration, encompassing not only the 'active' northern end but also the East, West and more family focused Southern ends.

The supporters of The San Jose Earthquakes are also known to engage in it.[9]

Alternatives[edit]

Fans of the Scottish club Celtic have a similar celebration known as "The Huddle", whilst also facing away from the pitch; the words sung by the fans are "Let's All Do The Huddle".

Contrary to popular thought among many football fans and commentators, "The Huddle" has nothing to do with The Poznań and certainly predates its arrival to British football by at least 3 years.[10] Celtic fans began doing "The Huddle" in tribute to the on-field huddle conducted by the Celtic team prior to kick-off, which was introduced by Tony Mowbray during his playing time at the club.[11]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Video: Poznan, Selebrasi Sindiran Gooners Untuk Manchester Biru". Bola.net. 2011-04-09. Retrieved 2011-04-29. 
  2. ^ a b "Manchester City fans all do the Poznan at Wembley during victory over United". London: Daily Mail. 2011-04-16. Retrieved 2012-04-20. 
  3. ^ "The "Poznań" and the Death of the Goal Celebration?". Modern-football.co.uk. 2011-05-20. Retrieved 2012-04-20. 
  4. ^ Pitt-Brooke, Jack (2011-04-20). "Poles apart: how fans of Poznan inspired City's unlikely dance craze". The Independent (London). Retrieved 2012-04-29. 
  5. ^ Sloan, Jenna (2011-02-21). "Man City fans are doing the Poznan". London: The Sun. Retrieved 2012-04-20. 
  6. ^ "Manchester City 4 Leicester 2: Roberto Mancini's revolution is on target for FA Cup glory". London: Daily Mail. 2011-01-19. Retrieved 2012-04-20. 
  7. ^ Jacob Steinberg (2012-04-08). "Arsenal v Manchester City - as it happened". London: Guardian. Retrieved 2012-04-20. 
  8. ^ Nick Metcalfe (2012-01-09). "Manchester United fans do the Poznan against Manchester City". London: Daily Mail. Retrieved 2012-04-20. 
  9. ^ "1906 Ultras Poznan in Palo Alto 2012". 
  10. ^ "Celtic fans Huddle". Youtube. Retrieved 3 October 2013. 
  11. ^ Murray, Ewan (16 June 2009). "Tony Mowbray confirmed as new manager of Celtic". The Guardian. Retrieved 3 October 2013.