The Putney School

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The Putney School
Putney School banner.png
Location
418 Houghton Brook Road, Putney, VT, U.S.
Information
Type Private independent co-educational boarding and day high school
Established 1935
Founder Carmelita Hinton
Director Emily Jones
Faculty 35 full-time, 24 part-time/adjunct
Enrollment 223
Student to teacher ratio 6:1
Campus 500 acres
Campus type Rural
Color(s) Green, White
Website

The Putney School is an independent high school in Putney, Vermont. It was founded in 1935 by Carmelita Hinton on the principles of the Progressive Education movement and the teachings of its principal exponent, John Dewey. It is a co-educational, college-preparatory boarding school, with a day-student component, located 12 miles (19 km) outside of Brattleboro, Vermont. Emily Jones is the director. The school enrolls approximately 225 students on a 500 acres (2.0 km2) hilltop campus with classrooms, dormitories, and a dairy farm on which all of its students work before graduating.[1]

The school emphasizes academics, a work program, the arts, and physical activity. The school's curriculum is intended to teach the value of labor, art, community, ethics, and scholarship for individual growth.

Campus[edit]

Animated panorama from the center of the quadrangle on the Putney campus.

Most of the buildings on the school's campus were partially or completely built by Putney students and faculty, with the exception of the most recent additions, the Michael S. Currier Center and the Field House. This Currier Center is a departure from Putney's customary white, colonial-style architecture, instead using stone and concrete walls in an angular design. It is used for dance, music, movie-making and visual-art presentations. The Field House, which opened in October 2009, was designed as a "net zero energy building", which means that it is expected that its net use of carbon energy over a year will equal zero. It does so by innovative design and construction features plus a field of solar panels.

Academic program[edit]

The Boston Globe wrote: "The school's combination of a New England work ethic and a strong academic program, its pioneering of coeducation and community service and its emphasis on music and the arts have made it a model for other independent schools...Putney remains committed to the total community of work and schooling that goes far beyond the more limited pieces of its tradition adopted by other schools."[2]

Then-Director Brian Morgan addresses the graduating Class of 2004.

The school is a member of the Independent Curriculum Group and in 2009 had a 10 year accreditation review by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges.

Notable alumni and faculty[edit]

Alumni[edit]

According to The Putney School 2008 Alumni Directory, notable alumni (graduation class shown) of The Putney School include:[3]

Faculty[edit]

Some Putney faculty members (subject taught in parentheses) had careers that extended beyond their teaching.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Putney at a glance". Website. Putney School. Retrieved 2014-01-30. 
  2. ^ Cohen, Muriel (January 1, 1995). "Putney - A Vermont School that Dared and Succeeded". The Boston Globe: A42. 
  3. ^ a b The Putney School 2008 Alumni Directory'. Bloomington, Indiana: University Publishing Corporation. 2008. 
  4. ^ Poniewozik, James (April 29, 2010). "Carlton Cuse and Damon Lindelof". The 2010 TIME 100—Artists. TIME. Retrieved 2014-03-28. 
  5. ^ Sherwin, Adam (2013-05-23). "World's most concise short story writer Lydia Davis wins Booker International Prize 2013". Independent. Retrieved 2013-05-23. 
  6. ^ Walker, Shaun (24 November 2013). "Arctic 30 captain re-evaluates protest methods after Russian jails Veteran Greenpeace skipper Peter Willcox was also captain of Rainbow Warrior – which was bombed by French agents in 1985". The Guardian. Retrieved 2014-03-28. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Lloyd, Susan McIntosh (1987). The Putney School: A Progressive Experiment. New Haven: Yale University Press. ISBN 0-300-03742-2. 
  • Sadovnik, Alan R.; Semel, Susan F., eds. (2002). Carmelita Chase Hinton and the Putney School. Founding Mothers and Others: Women Educational Leaders During the Progressive Era. Palgrave. ISBN 0-312-29502-2. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 42°59′16″N 72°33′17″W / 42.987791°N 72.554826°W / 42.987791; -72.554826