The Raccoons

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The Raccoons
The Raccoons TV Series.png
The Raccoons Title Screen
Genre Children's animated television series, Comedy-drama
Created by Kevin Gillis[1]
Directed by Kevin Gillis
Sebastian Grunstra
Paul Schibli
Voices of Len Carlson
Michael Magee
Linda Feige (Season 1)
Bob Dermer
Marvin Goldhar
Sharon Lewis
Keith Hampshire (Season 5)
Lisa Lougheed
Stuart Stone (Season 5)
Noam Zylberman (Seasons 1-5)
Nick Nichols (Seasons 1-4)
Susan Roman (Seasons 2-5)
Narrated by Geoffrey Winter
Theme music composer Kevin Gillis
Jon Stroll
Ending theme Run With Us
Country of origin Canada
Original language(s) English
French
No. of seasons 5
No. of episodes 60 (plus 4 specials) (List of episodes)
Production
Executive producer(s) Sheldon S. Wiseman
Producer(s) Kevin Gillis
Running time 25 mins
Production company(s) Gillis-Wiseman Productions,
Evergreen Raccoons Television Productions
Distributor Skywriter Media & Entertainment Group (2009-Present)
Broadcast
Original channel CBC Television
Picture format 480i (SDTV)
Audio format Stereo
(originally broadcast in Mono)
Original run July 4, 1985 – 1991

The Raccoons is a Canadian animated television series which was originally broadcast from 1985 to 1991 with three preceding television specials from its inception in 1980 and one direct to video special in 1984. The franchise was created by Kevin Gillis with the co-operation of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.[2]

Synopsis[edit]

The series revolves around Bert Raccoon and married couple Ralph and Melissa Raccoon, of whom Bert is a friend and roommate. The series mostly involved the trio's efforts against the industrialist forces of greedy aardvark millionaire Cyril Sneer, who usually tries to destroy the forest for a quick buck. However, the Raccoons would always save their forest from Cyril's schemes, with help from their forest friends including Schaeffer, a gentle sheepdog, Cedric, Cyril's college graduate son, and Sophia Tutu, Cedric's girlfriend. But, as the show progressed, Cyril became more of a sympathetic character, eventually becoming an anti-hero.

Lessons featured in the show mainly included environmentalism, but also included other lessons, including friendship, and teamwork.

History[edit]

The Raccoons franchise was originally conceived by Kevin Gillis in the 1970s, while appearing in shows like Celebrity Cooks, and Yes You Can. The initial idea for the show was created by Gillis and columnist Gary Dunford (they drew their inspiration for Ralph Raccoon from a dilemma that happened at a cottage in Ottawa). Dunford backed out, but Gillis took his idea to Ottawa lawyer Sheldon S. Wiseman, who saw a potential in Gillis' idea and put together a large group - animators, musicians, and writers, to create the first special to star the characters known as The Christmas Raccoons.[3][4] Production on the special began in 1979 and completed in 1980, and the special was shown on the December of that same year on CBC Television. It was also shown in countries around the world, including the United States and the United Kingdom. The special was a huge hit and resulted in two sequel specials The Raccoons on Ice and The Raccoons and the Lost Star and a direct-to-video special, The Raccoons: Let's Dance!. In 1981, United States TV networks CBS NBC and ABC approached Sheldon Wiseman about producing a 13 episode Raccoons TV series.[5] In 1984, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and The Disney Channel began funding on the TV series, which cost about $4.5 million to make.[6][7] In the United States, the show was run on The Disney Channel from 1985 to late-August 1992.[8]

Music[edit]

The series had a new wave soundtrack including the theme song "Run With Us" by cast member Lisa Lougheed, which was covered by Spray in 2004.[9] Season 1 ended with a different version of the song, not sung by Lougheed. "Run With Us" was performed in Season 1 by Steve Lunt. In the first season the French Canadian singer Luba performed several songs, several of which were later re-recorded by Lougheed for use in other seasons. There were also several other songs performed by other musicians such as Rita Coolidge and Rupert Holmes who performed songs for the first special, Leo Sayer and Coolidge again for the second, and John Schneider and Dottie West for the last TV special. Rory Dodd, The Dior Bros.[10] (actually Kevin Gillis and Jon Stroll under a pseudonym), and several other musicians also had songs performed, although somewhat rarely compared to the aforementioned people.

The earlier version of "Run With Us", like quite a few of the other songs from The Raccoons, were never officially released. The songs from the first two specials were released on the album Lake Freeze – The Raccoons Songtrack in 1983. A soundtrack for the fourth special was released in 1984, but featured vocals from Frank Floyd and Hank Martin to replace John Schneider. Nine of the songs from the series featured on Lougheed's 1988 album Evergreen Nights, though Lougheed only sang some of the songs (sometimes in duets), while some were sung by other artists (Curtis King Jr and Stephen Lunt). The French version of "Run With Us", as well as most of Luba and Lisa Lougheed's songs, was performed by the French Canadian singer Jano Bergeron with 'Run With Us' being renamed in French to"Viens Vers Nous".

The instrumental music was composed by Kevin Gillis and Jon Stroll and performed largely by the National Arts Centre Orchestra from Ottawa, Canada. Some of the instrumental cues heard in the series were actually recorded for The Raccoons and the Lost Star and re-used. Only two of the instrumental tunes (the opening and closing themes for The Raccoons on Ice) have ever been released officially (they can be found on the Lake Freeze album).

Animation[edit]

From 1979-1985, Canadian animation company Atkinson Film-Arts provided the animation for the four specials and first season of the show.[11][12] In 1986, after producing the first 11 episodes, Hinton Animation Studios took over to animate the remaining seasons of the show (seasons 2-5).[13][14]

Characters[edit]

Heroes[edit]

  • Bert Raccoon (voiced by Len Carlson) The main hero of the show. He is Ralph and Melissa's houseguest and is their best friend from childhood. An energetic raccoon with a lot of imagination, Bert always likes to seek out adventure and to live life to the fullest.
  • Ralph Raccoon (voiced by Bob Dermer) and Melissa Raccoon (voiced by Rita Coolidge (special 1-2), Dottie West (special 3), Linda Feige (season 1) and Susan Roman (season 2-5)) - the happily married couple who live in the "Raccoondominium" with their houseguest Bert, Ralph is also the founder of "The Evergreen Standard". Melissa is the more sensible of the three and is always there to give the boys a push in the right direction.
  • Cedric Sidney Sneer (voiced by Fred Little (specials) and Marvin Goldhar (series)) - Cyril Sneer's son and Bert Raccoon's best friend, and heir to the Sneer fortune.
  • Schaeffer (voiced by Carl Banas) - A large sheepdog, who is friends with the Raccoons. Originally portrayed as slow and dim-witted in the original specials, he quickly became one of the brightest characters on the show, and eventually opened the Blue Spruce Cafe and assists with the Raccoons' paper's technical needs.
  • Broo (voiced by Sharon Lewis) - A sheepdog puppy who seems to favour Bert as his owner in later seasons after the human characters were dropped from the show.
  • Sophia Tutu (voiced by Sharon Lewis) - Cedric's ditzy girlfriend, who is a superb swan glider and diver. She was phased out of the show in later years.

Villains[edit]

  • Cyril Sneer (voiced by Michael Magee) - The main villain of the series.[15] Cyril is an aardvark, with a long, pink nose, a ruthless and greedy businessman and Cedric's father. Although Cyril starts off villainous, he later softens up, although he is still greedy. Despite his money grubbing ways, he's shown to genuinely love his son and tries grooming him to take over the family business.
  • Snag (voiced by Michael Magee) - Cyril and Cedric Sneer's pet dog. He has blue fur and a nose similar to his owners.
  • The Pigs (voiced by Nick Nichols (Pig 1 (special 3-episode 50)), Keith Hampshire (Pig 1 (episode 51-60)), Len Carlson (Pig 2, Pig 3 (series)) and Fred Little (Pig 3 (special 3))) - Cyril's three bumbling henchmen and assistants. They are almost never referred to by name (although Pig 1 is usually called "Lloyd"), listed as Pig One, Two and Three in the credits.
  • The Bears (voiced by Len Carlson, Bob Dermer and Carl Banas) - are Cyril Sneer's additional henchmen, workers, soldiers, spies, etc.
  • Mr. Knox (voiced by Len Carlson) - An acquaintance of Cyril Sneer, a southern crocodile/business mogul; he is married to Lady Baden-Baden, and owner of the TV company K.N.O.X. TV.
  • Milton Midas (voiced by Len Carlson) - An eagle business man and scam artist.
  • Robin Steel (voiced by Len Carlson): A weasel and a sleazy con artist who along with his son Rod set up bogus races which are fixed to allow them to claim the prize money.

Other characters[edit]

  • Forest Ranger Dan (voiced by Rupert Holmes (special 1), Leo Sayer (special 2), John Schneider (special 3), Kevin Gillis (special 4 (uncredited)) and Murray Crunchley (series)) - He is the caretaker of the Evergreen Forest, as well as the father of Tommy and Julie and owner of Scaeffer and Broo during the specials and Season 1.
  • Tommy (voiced by Hadley Kay (specials) and Noam Zylberman (series)) - Forest Ranger Dan's son and one of Scaeffer and Broo's original owners as well as Julie's little brother.
  • Julie (voiced by Tammy Bourne (specials) and Vanessa Lindorres (series)) - Forest Ranger Dan's daughter and one of Scaeffer and Broo's original owners as well as Tommy's older sister.
  • Mr. Mammoth (voiced by Carl Banas) - A rhinoceros who is the richest, most powerful character on the show, he speaks in incoherent mumbles which are translated by his assistant
  • Lady Baden-Baden (voiced by Bob Dermer) - A wealthy, melodramatic hen who eventually marries Mr. Knox. She was an actress in her old days, and now is an enthusiastic patron of the arts.
  • Professor Witherspoon Smedley-Smythe (voiced by Len Carlson) - A goat who runs the Evergreen Forest Museum.
  • Dr. Canard (voiced by Len Carlson) - A duck who is Cyril's doctor.
  • Mr. Willow (voiced by Carl Banas) - A polar bear who is the owner of Willow's General Store.
  • Mrs. Suey-Ellen Pig (voiced by Nonnie Griffin) - The pigs' mother. She appears in two episodes, "Mom's the Word", where her name is revealed, and "Promises Promises".
  • George & Nicole Raccoon (voiced by Dan Hennessey & Elizabeth Hanna) - A couple who were once nomads.
  • Bentley Raccoon (voiced by Noam Zylberman (episode16-54) and Stuart Stone (as Stu Stone) (episode 55-60) - He's an expert with computers, and is a very typical younger kid, with a tendency to overemphasize his personal setbacks. He often favours Bert while Cyril Sneer thinks highly of him.
  • Lisa Raccoon (voiced by Lisa Lougheed) - Bentley's teenage basketball-playing sister, who becomes a prominent character in Season 5, after her first appearance in the Season 4 episode "Spring Fever", she is a caricature of her voice-actress.

Cast[edit]

Additional voices[edit]

Episodes[edit]

Home video releases[edit]

Embassy Pictures and its home video counterpart were responsible for releasing the specials and select episodes on home video from 1982 to 1994.[16] Embassy also released the specials on Laserdisc format. Other distributors, such as Catalyst & GoodTimes released some specials and episodes on VHS from in 1995 and 2001 to 2005.

In 2003, Morningstar Entertainment had released the show on DVD for the first time. Two 9-episode boxsets were released, each containing 3 discs that were also available separately. The discs were released without any region coding in NTSC format. The first set contained nine of the ten episodes from season 2 (omitting "Stop the Clock") and the second set contained the first nine episodes of season 3. The extras include character bios, a chance to create your own scene from the The Raccoons and Raccoon-A-Roma DVD-ROM content, like QuickTime animated sequences. Both sets are now out of print.

A 2-disc Region 2 PAL DVD release of the complete series 1 was released on September 17, 2007 through Fabulous Films Ltd. The bonus features on set 1 were duplicated from the Canadian release, mainly the create a scene and Raccoon-A-Roma DVD ROM content. They later released a DVD entitled "Three Adventures With The Raccoons" on April 7, 2008. This DVD contained the first 3 episodes of Series 1 with no extras. Series 2 was released on April 20, 2009 by Fabulous Films Ltd. in another 2-disc set. DVD extras on the set include character model sheets and a documentary.

On September 18, 2009, MORE Entertainment had released an 8-disc DVD set in Germany, it contained all 60 episodes (7-8 per disc) and no extras. The language track is German only.

On December 14, 2009, the first season of The Raccoons is released on iTunes in Canada. On April 19, 2010, the first season is also released on iTunes in the United States.[17][18][19] The first two seasons are released on DVD to Netflix in the United States in early-2010 and in Canada on August 2011.

On November 29, 2013, MORE Entertainment in Germany had released a DVD featuring all four of the Raccoons specials on DVD. Like the complete series set the only language track is German.

Reception[edit]

The Raccoons was well received by critics. The New York Times, in its review for their second TV special, said "the Raccoons are an adorable lot, supported nicely by an attractive production."[1] Variety praised the third special, The Raccoons and the Lost Star, calling it "a rollicking good adventure filled with space-age animation, high-tech gadgetry, lilting tunes, a lovable sheepdog, and the delightful Raccoons team."[20]

The show was nominated for many awards, including a Gemini Award for Best Sound and Best Writing, and won the Gemini for Best Animated Series.[21]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b O'CONNOR, JOHN J. (April 16, 1982). "TV WEEKEND; A-BOMB NURSERY TALES, RACCOONS AND IRELAND". The New York Times. Retrieved December 7, 2011. 
  2. ^ "Raccoons Get Own Series". The Leader-Post. October 18, 1985. Retrieved August 27, 2012. 
  3. ^ Wesley, David (December 8, 1984). "Raccoons Land A Disney Series". The Montreal Gazette. Retrieved August 27, 2012. 
  4. ^ "Christmas cartoon latest success for TV performer". Ottawa Citizen. November 13, 1980. Retrieved 2010-10-30. 
  5. ^ McLaughlin, Paula (November 2, 1981). "Film company skating on solid ice". Ottawa Citizen. Retrieved August 17, 2012. 
  6. ^ "Raccoon in TV show Bigtime". Ottawa Citizen. Retrieved 2010-10-30. 
  7. ^ Forchuk, Rick (November 15, 1985). "Raccoons Big Success". The Leader-Post. Retrieved August 27, 2012. 
  8. ^ The Disney Channel Magazine, Vol. 10, no. 4, August/September 1992: p. 36, 52.
  9. ^ Spray - Run With Us, discogs.com
  10. ^ The Dior Bros. @ IMDB.com
  11. ^ "Raccoons Are No Bandits". The Windsor Star. December 19, 1981. Retrieved August 27, 2012. 
  12. ^ All episodes in season 1 say in the end credits "Animation Facility: Atkinson Film-Arts"
  13. ^ Taylor, Noel (November 22, 1986). "Cartoon Characters Spawn A New Studio". Ottawa Citizen. Retrieved August 27, 2012. 
  14. ^ All episodes in season 2-5 say in the end credits "Produced at Hinton Animation Studios Inc."
  15. ^ Cyril Sneer wins Magee new fans, Toronto Star - Sep 20, 1987
  16. ^ Wayne, Jamie (December 14, 1985). "Raccoons Find Gold In Evergreen Forest". The Financial Post. Retrieved August 17, 2012. 
  17. ^ Zahed, Ramin (July 23, 2010). "Skywriter Media and E1 Launch Raccoons on iTunes". Animation Magazine. Retrieved December 29, 2010. 
  18. ^ DeMott, Rick (July 23, 2010) Eco-Toon Raccoons Coming to iTunes Animation World Network. Retrieved December 29, 2010
  19. ^ Getzler, Wendy (July 23, 2010). "The Raccoons make their comeback on iTunes US". KidScreen. Retrieved December 29, 2010. 
  20. ^ "The Raccoons: Promo Image". The UnOfficial Raccoons Home Page. Retrieved December 7, 2011. 
  21. ^ "Awards for "The Raccoons"". IMDB. Retrieved December 7, 2011. 

External links[edit]