Military Officers Association of America

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Military Officers Association of America (MOAA)
Moaalogo.jpg
MOAA Shield (L) and Seal (R)
Active 23 February 1929 – present
Country United States

The Military Officers Association of America, or MOAA, is an association of 370,000 military officers, including active duty, retired, National Guard, Reserve, and former officers and their families. It is an independent, nonprofit, and politically nonpartisan organization. The organization's focus includes military personnel matters, especially in regards to legislation affecting the MOAA community.

The organization was called The Retired Officers Association (TROA) from its founding[clarification needed] in 1929 to 2003, after a vote of members to change the name.[1]

Headquartered in Alexandria, Virginia, the organization is governed by a board of directors consisting of thirty-six officers from the seven uniformed services:[2] the Army, Marine Corps, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard, Public Health Service, and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The chairman of the board is retired United States Army General John H. Tilelli, Jr..[3]

Membership is open to active duty, retired, National Guard, Reserve, former commissioned officers, and warrant officers of the uniformed services.

Legislation supported[edit]

On 3 February 2014, the United States House of Representatives passed the GI Bill Tuition Fairness Act of 2013 (H.R. 357; 113th Congress).[4] If enacted, the bill would require states to offer veterans the in-state tuition price instead of the out-of-state tuition price regardless of whether the veteran met the residency requirement. The bill would also make other changes to veterans' benefits.[5] The Military Officers Association of America supported the bill. MOAA President Vice Adm. Norbert R. Ryan Jr., USN (Ret) said that the bill is "a practical, cost-saving approach that allows our returning warriors more options to take advantage of the Post-9/11 GI Bill and other GI bill programs."[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Mission and History". Military Officers Association of America. Retrieved 1 September 2011. 
  2. ^ "About MOAA — Leadership". Military Officers Association of America. Retrieved 8 March 2009. 
  3. ^ "Gen. Tilelli Elected MOAA Board Chairman". Military Officers Association of America). Retrieved 20 December 2012. 
  4. ^ Kasperowicz, Pete (3 February 2014). "House votes to give vets in-state tuition rates". The Hill. Retrieved 5 February 2014. 
  5. ^ "H.R. 357 - Summary". United States Congress. Retrieved 4 February 2014. 
  6. ^ "MOAA Strongly Supports Early Enactment of the GI Bill Tuition Fairness Act of 2013". PRWeb. 26 July 2013. Retrieved 5 February 2014. 

External links[edit]