Military Officers Association of America

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Military Officer Association of America
Moaalogo.jpg
Organization shield (left) and seal (right)
Abbreviation MOAA
Motto "One Powerful Voice"
Formation 23 February 1929
Type Military veterans organization
Headquarters Alexandria, Virginia
Region United States
Membership 380,000
Chairman of the Board General John H. Tilelli, Jr., USA (Retired)
President Vice Admiral Norbert R. Ryan, Jr., USN (Retired)
Board of directors 36 elected members
Publication Military Officer magazine
Website www.moaa.org
Formerly called Retired Officers Association

The Military Officers Association of America is a professional association of United States military officers. It is a nonprofit organization that advocates for a strong national defense, but is politically nonpartisan. The association supports government policies that benefit military members and their families. Its membership is made up of active duty, retired, and former commissioned officers and warrant officers from the uniformed services of the United States.

History[edit]

Originally called the Retired Officers Association, the organization that is now the Military Officers Association of America was founded in 1929. The association's first headquarters in Los Angeles, California. The association’s goal was to provide advice and assistance to fellow military officers throughout United States . The organization also promoted fraternal relations among America’s uniformed services]].[1][2]

During World War II, the association became an effective force actively serving its members. To help facilitate this, the association moved its headquarters to into the Washington area in 1944. At that time, the organization had approximately 2,600 members.[1]

In 2002, the association changed its name to the Military Officers Association of America. The change took effect on 1 January 2003.[1]

Today, the Military Officers Association of America has over 380,000 members. It is the largest military officers' organization in the United States. In addition to supporting a strong national defense program, the association provides military benefits counseling, career transition assistance, and educational assistance for children of military families (including families of enlisted personnel).[1]

Organization[edit]

Membership in the association is open to active duty, retired, and former commissioned officers and warrant officers from the uniformed services of the United States including the National Guard and Reserve components. The seven uniformed services are the United States Army, the United States Marine Corps, the United States Navy, the United States Air Force]], the United States Coast Guard, the United States Public Health Service, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Surviving spouses of deceased officers are eligible for auxiliary membership.[1]

The association is governed by a board of directors. The board is composed of 36 members from all seven uniformed services. Board members also represent six geographic regions. The board elects its chairman and three vice chairmen. It also elects the association’s president, chief financial officer, and secretary. The president oversees the association's day-to-day operations. The association’s headquarters is located in Alexandria, Virginia.[1][2][3]

Advocacy[edit]

The association promotes military professionals and encourages government policies that support military members and their families. The association staff identifies important national defense issues and provides association members with regular updates on key issues and pending legislation. The association advocates for a strong national defense, but does not get involved in military strategy debates or support specific weapons systems.[1][4]

On 3 February 2014, the United States House of Representatives passed the GI Bill Tuition Fairness Act of 2013 (H.R. 357; 113th Congress).[5] If enacted, the bill would require states to offer veterans the in-state tuition price instead of the out-of-state tuition price regardless of whether the veteran met the residency requirement. The bill would also make other changes to veterans' benefits.[6] The Military Officers Association of America supported the bill.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Mission and History", www.moaa.org, Military Officer Association of America, Alexandria, Virginia, 23 July 2014.
  2. ^ a b "Gen. Tilelli Elected MOAA Board Chairman". Military Officers Association of America). Retrieved 20 December 2012. 
  3. ^ "About MOAA — Leadership". Military Officers Association of America. Retrieved 8 March 2009. 
  4. ^ "Top Issues", www.moaa.org, Military Officers Association of America, Alexandria, Virginia, 18 July 2014.
  5. ^ Kasperowicz, Pete (3 February 2014). "House votes to give vets in-state tuition rates". The Hill. Retrieved 5 February 2014. 
  6. ^ "H.R. 357 - Summary". United States Congress. Retrieved 4 February 2014. 
  7. ^ "MOAA Strongly Supports Early Enactment of the GI Bill Tuition Fairness Act of 2013". PRWeb. 26 July 2013. Retrieved 5 February 2014. 

External links[edit]