The Royal Highland Fusiliers of Canada

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The Royal Highland Fusiliers of Canada
RHFC cap badge.jpg
Cap badge of The Royal Highland Fusiliers of Canada
Active 14 September 1866–present
Country Canada Canada
Branch Army
Type Fusiliers
Size One battalion
Part of Royal Canadian Infantry Corps
Garrison/HQ Cambridge and Kitchener, Ontario
Motto DEFENCE NOT DEFIANCE
March Quick: Seann Triubhas/The Highland Laddie
Slow: 74ths Slow March
Commanders
Colonel-in-Chief HRH the Duke of York

The Royal Highland Fusiliers of Canada is a Primary Reserve infantry regiment of the Canadian Army, with companies in Cambridge and Kitchener, and is a unit of 31 Canadian Brigade Group, headquartered in London, Ontario. The Duke of York, as a member of the Canadian Royal Family, acts as Colonel-in-Chief. Previously, this post was held by The Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowdon.

History[edit]

The Great War[edit]

The 34th Battalion, CEF, was authorized on 7 November 1914 and embarked for Britain on 23 October 1915, where it provided reinforcements to Canadian units in the field until 27 November 1916, when it was reorganized as the 34th Battalion (Boys'), CEF. The battalion was subsequently disbanded on 17 July 1917. The 111th Battalion (South Waterloo), CEF was authorized on 22 December 1915 and embarked for Britain on 25 September 1916 where on 13 October 1916 its personnel were absorbed by the 35th Battalion, CEF to provide reinforcements for Canadian units in the field. The 111th Battalion was disbanded on 21 May 1917. The 118th Battalion was authorized on 22 December 1915 and embarked for Britain on 22 January 1917 where on 6 February 1917, its personnel were absorbed by the 25th Reserve Battalion, CEF, to provide reinforcements for Canadian units in the field. The 118th Battalion was disbanded on 17 July 1917.

The Second World War[edit]

The Highland Light Infantry of Canada mobilized the The Highland Light Infantry of Canada, CASF, for active service on 24 May 1940. It was redesignated as the 1st Battalion, The Highland Light Infantry of Canada, CASF, on 7 November 1940 and embarked for Britain on 20 July 1941. On D-Day, 6 June 1944, it landed on JUNO Beach in Normandy as part of the 9th Canadian Infantry Brigade, 3rd Canadian Infantry Division, and it continued to fight in North-West Europe until the end of the war. The overseas battalion was disbanded on 15 January 1946. The regiment subsequently mobilized the 3rd Battalion, The Highland Light Infantry of Canada, Canadian Infantry Corps, Canadian Army Occupation Force on 1 June 1945 for service in Germany. The 3rd Battalion was disbanded on 1 May 1946.[1]

The camp flag of The Royal Highland Fusiliers of Canada.

The Scots Fusiliers mobilized the 1st Battalion, The Scots Fusiliers, CASF, for active service on 5 March 1942. It served in Canada in a home defence role as part of Military District No. 2 until the battalion was disbanded on 15 October 1943.[2]

The Highland Light Infantry regiment participated in the D-Day landings, disembarking at Nan sector on Juno Beach on June 6, 1944 with the rest of the 9th Brigade, which consisted of the The Highland Light Infantry, the Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry Highlanders, and the North Nova Scotia Highlanders. These regiments were not in the first wave assault, but landed later in the morning and advanced through the lead brigades.[3]

War In Afghanistan[edit]

The regiment contributed an aggregate of more than 20% of its authorized strength to the various Task Forces which served in Afghanistan between 2002 and 2014.[4]

Battle honours[edit]

The regimental colour of the Royal Highland Fusiliers of Canada.

In the list below, battle honours in capitals were awarded for participation in large operations and campaigns, while those in lowercase indicate honours granted for more specific battles. Battle honours followed by a "+" are emblazoned on the regimental colour.

The Great War[edit]

The Second World War[edit]

War in Afghanistan[edit]

AFGHANISTAN[5]

Lineage[edit]

The Royal Highland Fusiliers of Canada[edit]

  • Originated 14 September 1866 in Berlin, Ontario, as the 29th Waterloo Battalion of Infantry
  • Redesignated 8 May 1900 as the 29th Waterloo Regiment
  • Redesignated 15 April 1915 as the 29th Regiment (Highland Light Infantry of Canada)
  • Redesignated 29 March 1920 as The Highland Light Infantry of Canada
  • Redesignated 7 November 1940 as the 2nd (Reserve) Battalion, The Highland Light Infantry of Canada
  • Redesignated 1 May 1946 as The Highland Light Infantry of Canada
  • Amalgamated 1 October 1954 with The Perth Regiment and renamed as The Perth and Waterloo Regiment (Highland Light Infantry of Canada)
  • Amalgamation ceased 1 April 1957, the two regiments ceased to be amalgamated and resumed their former designations
  • Amalgamated 26 February 1965 with The Scots Fusiliers of Canada and redesignated as The Highland Fusiliers of Canada
  • Redesignated 7 July 1998 as The Royal Highland Fusiliers of Canada on .[6]

The Scots Fusiliers of Canada[edit]

  • Originated 21 September 1914 in Berlin, Ontario when an "eight company regiment of infantry" was authorized to be formed
  • Designated 1 February 1915 as the 108th Regiment
  • Redesignated 29 March 1920 as The Waterloo Regiment
  • Redesignated 3 August 1920 as the North Waterloo Regiment
  • Redesignated 15 September 1928 as The Scots Fusiliers of Canada
  • Redesignated 5 March 1942 as the 2nd (Reserve) Battalion, The Scots Fusiliers of Canada
  • Redesignated 15 October 1943 as The Scots Fusiliers of Canada (Reserve)
  • Redesignated 7 November 1945 as The Scots Fusiliers of Canada
  • Converted 1 April 1946 to artillery and redesignated as the 54th Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment (Scots Fusiliers of Canada), RCA
  • Converted 1 December 1959 to infantry and redesignated as The Scots Fusiliers of Canada
  • Amalgamated 26 February 1965 with The Highland Light Infantry of Canada

Perpetuations[edit]

The Great War[edit]

Alliances[edit]

Armoury[edit]

Site Date(s) Designated Location Description Image
Cambridge Armoury Ainslie Street South, 1914-5 1987 Recognized - Register of the Government of Canada Heritage Buildings Cambridge, Ontario
  • Housing The Royal Highland Fusiliers of Canada, this centrally located, brick and stone structure features a façade, flanking towers and a low-pitched gable roof; it projects a solid, fortified appearance

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Canadian Forces Publication A-DH-267-003 Insignia and Lineages of the Canadian Forces. Volume 3: Combat Arms Regiments.
  2. ^ Canadian Forces Publication A-DH-267-003 Insignia and Lineages of the Canadian Forces. Volume 3: Combat Arms Regiments.
  3. ^ webpage about Juno Beach
  4. ^ http://pm.gc.ca/eng/news/2014/05/09/south-west-asia-theatre-honours
  5. ^ "South-West Asia Theatre Honours". Office of the Prime Minister of Canada. Retrieved 11 May 2014. 
  6. ^ Canadian Forces Publication A-DH-267-003 Insignia and Lineages of the Canadian Forces. Volume 3: Combat Arms Regiments.

Order of precedence[edit]

Preceded by
4th Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment
The Royal Highland Fusiliers of Canada Succeeded by
The Grey and Simcoe Foresters

Notes[edit]

External links[edit]