The Seattle Star

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For the 21st century free neighborhood newspaper, see Seattle Star (2002–2005).
A clipping from a January 23, 1943 edition of The Seattle Star

The Seattle Star was a daily newspaper that ran from February 25, 1899,[1] to August 13, 1947. It was owned by E.W. Scripps and in 1920 was transferred to Scripps McRae League of Newspapers (later Scripps-Canfield League), after a falling-out within the Scripps family.[citation needed] The company, which eventually became Scripps League Newspapers, Inc., owned the paper until 1942, when it was sold to a group of local Seattle businessmen including Howard Parrish, its publisher. Soon after the sale, it reverted to its previous broadsheet format after having been a tabloid for a short time. Of the three Seattle general circulation dailies (Seattle Post-Intelligencer and Seattle Times being the other two), it was the smallest in circulation, although it had been the largest paper in the city around 1900.[citation needed]

For most of its life the paper was known as the "working man's" or "working person's" paper. It was staunchly pro-labor, reflecting the values of E.W. Scripps.[2] In 1919, it became vehemently anti-Japanese, especially toward Japanese-Americans who lived in its vicinity.[3]

After World War II, all of its assets minus the building and machinery were sold to The Seattle Times for $360,000 in 1947. Management said the sale was needed because of the rising labor costs and the newsprint shortage.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Baldasty, Gerald J. (1999). E. W. Scripps and the Business of Newspapers, p. 33. Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois.
  2. ^ "Ingratitude?" in I Protest: Selected Disquisitions of E. W. Scripps, edited by Oliver Knight. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1966.
  3. ^ Neiwert, David A. (2005). Strawberry Days: How Internment Destroyed a Japanese American Community, pp. 57–60. Palgrave Macmillan.

Sources[edit]

  • The Seattle Star, 1899–1947, Seattle Public Library. As of 2014-05-09, online archive includes issues from shortly after the newspapers founding, through 1922.
  • Casserly, Jack: Scripps the Divided Dynasty. Donald I. Fine, Inc. 1993.

External links[edit]