The Secret Ways

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The Secret Ways
The Secret Ways Poster.jpg
Original film poster
Directed by Phil Karlson
Richard Widmark
Produced by Richard Widmark
Euan Lloyd
Written by Jean Hazlewood
Based on The Last Frontier
1959 novel 
by Alistair McLean
Starring Richard Widmark
Sonja Ziemann
Music by John Williams
Cinematography Max Greene
Edited by Aaron Stell
Distributed by Universal Pictures
Release dates
  • April 24, 1961 (1961-04-24) (U.S.)
Running time
112 min.
Language English

The Secret Ways is a 1961 American thriller film based on Alistair McLean's novel The Last Frontier. It stars Richard Widmark.

Plot[edit]

In Vienna, 1956 after Soviet tanks crush the Hungarian uprising American adventurer Michael Reynolds (Richard Widmark) is hired by an international espionage ring to smuggle a noted scholar and resistance leader, Professor Jansci (Walter Rilla), out of Communist-ruled Hungary during the Hungarian Revolution. Reynolds goes to Vienna to see the professor's daughter, Julia (Sonja Ziemann), and he persuades her to accompany him to Budapest. Once there, Reynolds is kidnapped by freedom fighters who take him to the professor's secret headquarters.

Meanwhile, one of Jansci's trusted aides is captured by the Hungarian Secret Police and forced to reveal the professor's hiding place. Reynolds, Julia, and Jansci are quickly rounded up and taken to Szarhaza Prison, where they are tortured by the sadistic Colonel Hidas (Howard Vernon).

They are rescued by a resistance fighter known as The Count (Charles Régnier), who tricks the Communists into placing the prisoners in his custody. At the last moment the ruse is discovered. The Count is killed as the other three race to the airport where a chartered plane is waiting. Hidas pursues them but is killed in an accident on the runway. Safe at last, Reynolds, Julia, and the professor leave Hungary.

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

According to an interview in Cinema Retro, associate producer Euan Lloyd stated that producer and star Richard Widmark did not like director Phil Karlson's proposed tongue in cheek direction of the screenplay written by Widmark's wife Jean Hazlewood. Widmark took over the direction of the film without credit.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cinema Retro Issue #1 Euan Lloyd Interview

External links[edit]