The Sermon of St. Stephen (Carpaccio)

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The Sermon of St. Stephen
La Prédication de saint Etienne à Jérusalem de Carpaccio.jpg
Artist Vittore Carpaccio
Year 1514
Type Oil on canvas
Dimensions 148 cm × 194 cm (58 in × 76 in)
Location Louvre, Paris

The Sermon of Saint Stephen is an oil-on-canvas by Italian artist of the Venetian school Vittore Carpaccio, painted in 1514. It is now in the Louvre in Paris.

History[edit]

This painting was one of five scenes representing the life of Saint Stephen, painted between 1511 and 1514 for the Scuola dei Lanieri, Santo Stefano (Venice).[1] The series was broken up in 1806, when the religious houses were suppressed.[2] Two panels went to the Brera Gallery, Milan; in 1812, Vivant Denon exchanged some of the northern paintings in the Louvre for Italian works in the Brera, and one of these panels was transferred under this arrangement. Another is in Berlin; one has disappeared, and the fifth is in Stuttgart.[3]

The Sermon of Saint Stephen the deacon, represented in this Louvre painting, took place in Jerusalem. This gave carpaccio an excuse for filling his canvas with picturesque oriental costumes and architecture. Jerusalem in the early days of Christianity is here based on Constantinople - a fantastic and imaginary Constatinople full of Turkish, antique, Byzantine and Italian elements. Carpaccio refers with pride, in a letter to the Marquis of Mantua, to a view of Jerusalem which he had painted.[4]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Cf. the Louvre website for specific info on this
  2. ^ Cf. Nurturing art in the Venetian scuole, Roderick Conway Morris, International Herald Tribune, Feb.2005.
  3. ^ Dominique Vivant, Baron de Denon (1747–1825) was a French artist, writer, diplomat, author, and archaeologist, appointed first director of the Louvre Museum by Napoleon after the Egyptian campaign of 1798-1801. Information on the five panels is given by the Louvre, on their website's relevant pages [1]. See also S. Mason and A. Ellis, Carpaccio: The Major Pictorial Cycles: The Narrative Paintings, Skira (2000)
  4. ^ A. Gentili, Le storie di Carpaccio. Venezia, i turchi, gli ebrei, Marsilio, (2006).

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  • Patricia Fortini Brown, Venetian Narrative Painting in the Age of Carpaccio (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1988/1994)
  • Augusto Gentili, Le storie di Carpaccio. Venezia, i turchi, gli ebrei, Marsilio, (2006) (Italian)
  • Peter Humfrey, Carpaccio, Chaucer Press (2005)
  • Stefania Mason & Andrew Ellis, Carpaccio: The Major Pictorial Cycles: The Narrative Paintings, Skira (2000)
  • Public Domain This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainChisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press.