The Singles: 1969–1973

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The Singles 1969–1973
Compilation album by The Carpenters
Released November 9, 1973
Recorded 1969–1973
Genre Rock
Length 41:47
Label A&M
Producer Richard & Karen Carpenter, Jack Daugherty
The Carpenters chronology
The Singles: 1969–1973
(1973)
The Singles: 1974–1978
(1978)
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 4/5 stars[1]
Robert Christgau C+[2]
Džuboks (favorable) [3]
The Rolling Stone Album Guide 3/5 stars[4]

The Singles: 1969–1973 is an album by the brother/sister pop duo The Carpenters. A greatest hits collection, it topped the charts in the U.S. and the United Kingdom and became one of the best-selling albums of the 1970s. Features of this compilation include a newly recorded version of "Top of the World", "Ticket to Ride" and a number of musical introductions and segues between the songs "Superstar", "Rainy Days and Mondays" and "Goodbye to Love". It has been certified 7× platinum in the U.S. alone. In the UK, the album reached #1 for 17 (non-consecutive) weeks.

Richard gave the album this title because he doesn't like the term "greatest hits" because he felt it was "an overused thing".[5] He continues:

Individuals and groups with two or three hits all of a sudden put them on an album, use filler for the rest and title it "greatest hits". This album contains eleven true hits and it just wasn't slapped together. We've remixed a few, re-cut one and joined a couple of others. It's simply something I believe we owe our audience and ourselves.[5]

Track listing[edit]

No. Title Writer(s) Length
1. "We've Only Just Begun"   Paul Williams; Roger Nichols 4:03
2. "Top of the World"   Richard Carpenter; John Bettis 2:56
3. "Ticket to Ride"   John Lennon; Paul McCartney 4:10
4. "Superstar"   Bonnie Bramlett; Leon Russell 3:49
5. "Rainy Days and Mondays"   Paul Williams; Roger Nichols 3:40
6. "Goodbye to Love"   Richard Carpenter; John Bettis 3:50
7. "Yesterday Once More"   Richard Carpenter; John Bettis 3:50
8. "It's Going to Take Some Time"   Carole King; Toni Stern 2:55
9. "Sing"   Joe Raposo 3:20
10. "For All We Know"   Fred Karlin, Jimmy Griffin, Robb Royer 2:34
11. "Hurting Each Other"   Gary Geld; Peter Udell 2:46
12. "(They Long to Be) Close to You"   Burt Bacharach; Hal David 3:42

EP[edit]

US 7" promo (1973); A&M LLP 238
  1. "Ticket to Ride" (1973 version)
  2. "(They Long to Be) Close to You"
  3. "We've Only Just Begun"
  4. "Top of the World"
  5. "Rainy Days and Mondays"

Chart positions[edit]

Year Chart Position
1974 Pop Albums 1
UK Albums Chart[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Allmusic review
  2. ^ Robert Christgau Consumer Guide
  3. ^ Kostić, Borjan. Džuboks (in Serbian) (Belgrade: Karpentersi - Singl ploče od 1969. do 1973.) (1 (second series)): 44. 
  4. ^ Brackett, Nathan; Christian Hoard (2004). The Rolling Stone Album Guide. New York City, New York: Simon and Schuster. p. 140. ISBN 0-7432-0169-8. 
  5. ^ a b Billboard magazine article, written by Frank H Lieberman, 1973.
  6. ^ "Number 1 Albums – 1970s". The Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on 9 February 2008. Retrieved 15 June 2011. 
Preceded by
Goodbye Yellow Brick Road by Elton John
Billboard 200 number-one album
January 5–11, 1974
Succeeded by
You Don't Mess Around with Jim by Jim Croce
Preceded by
And I Love You So by Perry Como

Old, New, Borrowed and Blue by Slade

Journey to the Centre of the Earth by Rick Wakeman

Diamond Dogs by David Bowie
UK number-one album
2 – 23 February 1974

9 March – 18 May 1974

1 June 1974

6 July 1974
Succeeded by
Old, New, Borrowed and Blue by Slade

Journey to the Centre of the Earth by Rick Wakeman

Diamond Dogs by David Bowie

Caribou by Elton John