The Slave's Lament

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The Slave's Lament is a song first published in 1792 in Volume Four of the Scots Musical Museum.[1] Though not attributed, the lyrics are generally believed to have been written by Robert Burns.

Lyrics[edit]

It was in sweet Senegal that my foes did me enthral,

For the lands of Virginia,-ginia, O:

Torn from that lovely shore, and must never see it more;

And alas! I am weary, weary O:

Torn from that lovely shore, and must never see it more;

And alas! I am weary, weary O.


All on that charming coast is no bitter snow and frost,

Like the lands of Virginia,-ginia, O:

There streams for ever flow, and there flowers for ever blow,

And alas! I am weary, weary O:

There streams for ever flow, and there flowers for ever blow,

And alas! I am weary, weary O:


The burden I must bear, while the cruel scourge I fear,

In the lands of Virginia,-ginia, O;

And I think on friends most dear, with the bitter, bitter tear,

And alas! I am weary, weary O:

And I think on friends most dear, with the bitter, bitter tear,

And alas! I am weary, weary O.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "The Slave's Lament". James Johnson. Retrieved 19 January 2014. 

References[edit]

http://www.robertburns.org/works/371.shtml

http://sangstories.webs.com/slaveslament.htm

http://burnsc21.glasgow.ac.uk/the-slaves-lament-davina-pittock/

http://www.stewarthendrickson.com/songs/SlavesLament.html

http://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/theslaveslament.html